Tag Archives: tax

Join Us for a Webinar: Employment Law and Tax Developments Businesses Might Have Missed While Focused on COVID-19

Over the last several months there have been developments in employment law and tax not directly related to COVID-19 that you may have missed. While businesses have been focused on responding to COVID-19—learning about the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act, the PPP, and developments with unemployment—the Supreme Court and government agencies have been making decisions that impact the workplace.

We invite you to join us for a complimentary, one-hour Zoom webinar to discuss some of these decisions and how they may impact the workplace.

TOPICS INCLUDE:

  • Expansion of Title VII protection of sex to include sexual orientation and gender identity
  • Expansion of rights of religious employers
  • Changes to certain provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act
  • Updates from the National Labor Relations Board on workplace investigations and work email
  • Amendment to the Florida Civil Rights Act
  • Tax planning for 2020
  • Tax provisions supporting businesses

Wednesday, August 12
10:00 – 11:00 a.m. 

REGISTER NOW >

PRESENTED BY:

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
Board Certified Labor & Employment Attorney | Williams Parker

Gail E. Farb
Labor & Employment Attorney | Williams Parker

Beth C. Ebersole
CPA, ABV | Kerkering, Barberio & Co.

Moderator:
Thomas B. Luzier
Board Certified Real Estate Attorney | Williams Parker

Amounts Paid to Employees for Sick and Family Leave Wages Are to be Reported on W-2s

Yesterday, July 8, 2020, the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) issued Notice 2020-54, which provides guidance to employers on reporting qualified sick and family leave wages paid to employees under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Enacted this past March 2020, the FFCRA generally requires employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide paid leave due to certain circumstances related to COVID-19.  Notice 2020-54 directs employers to “separately state” each of the paid sick and family leave wage amounts either in Box 14 of Form W-2 or in a statement that accompanies the Form W-2.

The guidance provides employers with adaptable model language for use in the Form W-2 instructions for employees. An excerpt of that language is as follows:

“Included in Box 14, if applicable, are amounts paid to you as qualified sick leave wages or qualified family leave wages under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Specifically, up to three types of paid qualified sick leave wages or qualified family leave wages are reported in Box 14:

  • Sick leave wages subject to the $511 per day limit because of care you required;
  • Sick leave wages subject to the $200 per day limit because of care you provided to another; and
  • Emergency family leave wages.”

The Notice goes on to state that the wage amount required to be reported by employers on Form W-2 will provide self-employed individuals who are also employees with the information necessary to determine the amount of any sick and family leave equivalent credits they may claim in their self-employed capacities. We recommend that employers review the Notice’s model language for their Form W-2 instructions.

Join Us for a Webinar on Business Basics

Every day is a new reality, especially in times of crisis, when the only constant seems to be change itself.

Whether dealing with challenges faced from COVID-19 or using the current time to plan new ventures, it is important to plan and implement strategies in line with today’s fluid business environment. Whether starting a new business or confirming that your existing business is on track, knowing the basics can help maximize your success.

Join Williams Parker attorneys Jennifer Fowler-Hermes and Elizabeth Stamoulis, accompanied by Kathy Hargreaves, CPA, CFP®, CPC®, of Kerkering and Barberio, for a virtual and interactive presentation covering:

• Basic business and employment documents
• Protecting intellectual property
• Properly classifying workers to avoid missteps
• Tax implications and proper tax registration

BUSINESS BASIC: GETTING IT RIGHT FROM THE START (OR IN THE MIDDLE)

Friday, June 12
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Sign Up >

Our Business Solutions team helps business owners and entities assess and manage risk, advise on tax and compliance issues, provide workout and turnaround guidance, and offer creditor, restructuring, and bankruptcy representation. We work with HR executives to assess potential employment liability; review, update, and advise on employment policies; defend employment law claims; and assist with regulatory guidelines. For those seeing opportunity amidst uncertainty, the firm offers start-up guidance on tax, employment, and intellectual property issues. Its attorneys assist commercial and residential landlords and tenants with abatements, deferments, amendments, forbearance, and help identify remedies, including business interruption insurance and updated lease provisions. Should litigation arise, the team is prepared to advocate on your behalf.

IRS Guidance Regarding Tax Credits for Paid Leaves; the Families First Coronavirus Response Act; and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act

The IRS has provided some guidance regarding the process for employers to obtain the tax credits provided for in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (“CARES”) Act. The FFCRA tax credits are to reimburse small and midsize employers for amounts paid to employees that qualify for and use the new paid sick and/or paid family leave provisions of the FFCRA. The guidance for these credits, which is presented as Basic Frequently Asked Questions (“FAQ”), provides details on how employers start claiming the credits, what documentation the employer must retain to substantiate eligibility, and how to determine the amount of the tax credits for qualified leave wages. The FAQ also briefly addresses the interplay between the FFCRA tax credits and the CARES tax credit. View the FAQ.

Similar guidance is available for the CARES Act’s Employee Retention Credit. This credit is 50% of up to $10,000 in wages paid by an eligible employer whose business has suffered financially due to COVID-19 and is available to all eligible employers regardless of size. Employers who have taken a small business loan under the Act’s Paycheck Protection Program are not, however, entitled to this credit. More information and an FAQ is available from the IRS.

Government employers are not entitled to either the FFCRA tax credits or the CARES tax credit.

Williams Parker has launched a multidisciplinary task force of lawyers across the firm to advise on issues arising from COVID-19 and to provide guidance for affected clients. This team is closely monitoring legal developments and guidance from federal, state, and local government and public health officials. For the latest updates, please visit our website.

Corporate and tax attorney Christina J. Strasser contributed to this post. 

A New W-4

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act has several provisions that impact payroll, employment tax, and employee benefits. In accordance with these changes, the IRS released new withholding tables, as well as a new W-4. Although the IRS is not requiring employers have its entire workforce (hired before March 30, 2018) complete the new W-4, as of February 15, 2018, employers were required to begin withholding from employee wages based on new withholding tables.

At this time, employers should, at a minimum, have all new hires and any employee that has a change in their tax status (e.g., marriage), complete the new 2018 W-4. Further, if employers are not requiring all employees to complete new forms, employers should at least encourage their employees to review their withholdings, as the Act eliminated certain exemptions and allowances. As a result, some employees’ allowances may be overstated, resulting in under-withholding for the year. If employees want to submit a new W-4, they should be allowed.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558