Tag Archives: Social Security

Treasury Releases Guidance Implementing Executive Action on Employment Tax Deferral


On Friday, August 28, the Treasury Department (“Treasury”) released guidance implementing President Trump’s executive directive to defer the employee portion of social security tax. As part of the continued response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Notice 2020-65 allows employers to make this deferral during the period of September 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020 for employees earning below a threshold amount of $4,000 during a bi-weekly pay period. This threshold is to be determined on a per-pay period basis rather than as an annualized amount. While not clearly stated in the Notice, both Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) have framed the deferral as optional for employers.

For those employers who do choose to defer the employee share of social security tax, these amounts will be postponed until the period beginning on January 1, 2021 and ending on April 30, 2021. This could mean that absent further legislation affording permanent forgiveness of these amounts, employees would be obligated to make increased payroll payments for that four-month period. If employers fail to withhold and deposit any deferred amounts by May 1, 2021, the Notice states that they will be on the hook for penalties and interest—again, assuming Congress fails to enact legislation that says otherwise.

What remains unclear is whether employees may choose to opt out of an employer’s choice to defer and how employers should treat the deferred taxes of employees who are terminated before these amounts are fully repaid in 2021. The Notice does, however, state that “[i]f necessary, the [employer] may make arrangements to otherwise collect the total Applicable Taxes from the employee,” suggesting that an employer could, for example, deduct any deferred tax owing from an employee’s final paycheck to the extent permitted by the Fair Labor Standards Act.

The IRS has released a draft update of Form 941, Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return, on which employers may take into account employee social security withholding that is deferred. The key change appears to be on page 3, line 24, which asks for the “Deferred amount of the employee share of social security tax included in line 13b.”

We hope to see more concrete guidance from Treasury in the coming weeks.

Avoiding Errors in the Match Game: Responding to the Rising Number of “No-Match” Letters

Starting late last year and continuing on the heels of tax season, the Social Security Administration (SSA) has been sending employers Employer Correction Request Notices, also known as EDCOR notices or “no-match” letters. An example “no-match” letter is available at the SSA’s website. These “no-match” letters notify an employer that the information submitted on an employee’s W-2, such as the Social Security Number or SSN, does not match the SSA’s records. Even though it’s not conclusive evidence that an employee is not authorized to work in the United States, it can put an employer on notice of a possible issue, which can lead to potential compliance issues and liability under federal law. See our previous discussion here and here on recent Form I-9 compliance issues.

Of course, common discrepancies can also trigger a “no-match” letter, such as  unreported name changes, typos or input errors by the SSA, reporting errors by an employer or employee, errors in recognizing multiple last names or hyphenated last names, or identity theft.

In other words, “no-match” letters can arise because of simple administrative errors. Employers should not presume the “no-match” letter conveys information about an employee’s immigration status or authorization to work within the United States. Still, the “no-match” letters may also indicate that an individual provided false identification.

Employers must be cautious when dealing with a “no-match” letter. An overreaction—such as requesting excessive or unnecessary documentation from employees—can violate the anti-discrimination provisions in federal law, which generally prohibit discriminatory employment practices because an employee’s national origin, citizenship, or immigration status. Thus, an employer should not attempt to do any of the following after receiving a “no-match” letter:

  • Take any adverse employment action against an employee subject to a “no-match” letter, including—but not limited to—firing, demoting, cutting hours, reducing the wages of, or writing up such an employee;
  • Follow different procedures for different classes of employees based on the employees’ respective national origin or citizenship status;
  • Require the employee immediately provide a written report that the SSA verified the requisite information (primarily because the SSA may not ever provide such a report);
  • Immediately reverify the employee’s eligibility to work by requesting a new Form I-9 based solely on the “no-match” letter; or
  • Require an employee produce any specific I-9 documents, such as a Social Security card, to address the no-match issue.

The question then becomes: How should employer respond to a “no-match” letter?

Unfortunately, the letters usually do not identify the employees for whom the SSA finds there is a “no-match” issue. To determine which employees’ information is at issue, an employer must first register with the SSA’s Business Service Online website. Through that website, an employer can then compare the employee names and SSN information in its files against the SSA’s records to make sure the information was correctly submitted, and no typographical error occurred. If an employer determines it misreported the information, it can issue a correction through an updated IRS Form W-2C. An employer generally has 60 days from receipt of the “no-match” letter to issue a Form W-2C to make corrections if that is the cause of the “no-match.”

Should an employer determine that it properly reported the information, then the employer will need to further investigate and may want to seek guidance from counsel before taking further action.

John C. Getty
jgetty@williamsparker.com
(941) 329-6622