Tag Archives: Employment Law

Join Us for a Webinar: Employment Law and Tax Developments Businesses Might Have Missed While Focused on COVID-19

Over the last several months there have been developments in employment law and tax not directly related to COVID-19 that you may have missed. While businesses have been focused on responding to COVID-19—learning about the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act, the PPP, and developments with unemployment—the Supreme Court and government agencies have been making decisions that impact the workplace.

We invite you to join us for a complimentary, one-hour Zoom webinar to discuss some of these decisions and how they may impact the workplace.

TOPICS INCLUDE:

  • Expansion of Title VII protection of sex to include sexual orientation and gender identity
  • Expansion of rights of religious employers
  • Changes to certain provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act
  • Updates from the National Labor Relations Board on workplace investigations and work email
  • Amendment to the Florida Civil Rights Act
  • Tax planning for 2020
  • Tax provisions supporting businesses

Wednesday, August 12
10:00 – 11:00 a.m. 

REGISTER NOW >

PRESENTED BY:

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
Board Certified Labor & Employment Attorney | Williams Parker

Gail E. Farb
Labor & Employment Attorney | Williams Parker

Beth C. Ebersole
CPA, ABV | Kerkering, Barberio & Co.

Moderator:
Thomas B. Luzier
Board Certified Real Estate Attorney | Williams Parker

Amounts Paid to Employees for Sick and Family Leave Wages Are to be Reported on W-2s

Yesterday, July 8, 2020, the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) issued Notice 2020-54, which provides guidance to employers on reporting qualified sick and family leave wages paid to employees under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Enacted this past March 2020, the FFCRA generally requires employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide paid leave due to certain circumstances related to COVID-19.  Notice 2020-54 directs employers to “separately state” each of the paid sick and family leave wage amounts either in Box 14 of Form W-2 or in a statement that accompanies the Form W-2.

The guidance provides employers with adaptable model language for use in the Form W-2 instructions for employees. An excerpt of that language is as follows:

“Included in Box 14, if applicable, are amounts paid to you as qualified sick leave wages or qualified family leave wages under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Specifically, up to three types of paid qualified sick leave wages or qualified family leave wages are reported in Box 14:

  • Sick leave wages subject to the $511 per day limit because of care you required;
  • Sick leave wages subject to the $200 per day limit because of care you provided to another; and
  • Emergency family leave wages.”

The Notice goes on to state that the wage amount required to be reported by employers on Form W-2 will provide self-employed individuals who are also employees with the information necessary to determine the amount of any sick and family leave equivalent credits they may claim in their self-employed capacities. We recommend that employers review the Notice’s model language for their Form W-2 instructions.

Watch On-Demand: Webinar on Novel Issues Relating to Employees Working Remotely

As more employees work from home, employers are facing questions about how to comply with employment laws in a manner that minimizes risks associated with remote work. Our Business Solutions team recently presented a webinar addressing many of the employment-related issues arising from remote work. The head of our Labor & Employment practice, Jennifer Fowler-Hermes and L&E attorney John Getty were joined by Brad Hall, a workers’ compensation defense attorney, to discuss a variety of topics, including how to properly track work hours, complying with employment laws, the importance of telework agreements, and whether and to what extent workers’ compensation laws apply. Watch it on-demand below.

 

Florida’s Road to Recovery Begins

Late yesterday, on April 29, 2020, Florida’s Governor issued his Phase 1: Safe. Smart. Step-by-Step Plan for Florida’s Recovery in Executive Order 20-112 and clarifying FAQs, which will be effective 12:01 a.m. on May 4, 2020, until a new order is issued. Continue reading

DOL Answers More Questions About Paid Sick Leave and Expanded Family and Medical Leave Under the FFCRA

On April 6, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Wage and Hour Division (WHD) issued yet another series of questions and answers to provide additional guidance regarding the protections and relief offered by the new Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The DOL also reorganized its FFCRA questions page by categories (definitions, eligibility, coverage, application, and enforcement), in addition to its questions and answers by number.

As noted in our recent blog post, the FFCRA provides expanded paid and unpaid family and medical leave broader than the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) and paid sick leave to certain employees affected by COVID-19. In addition, it provides help for individuals and businesses impacted by the pandemic—like reimbursement through a refundable tax credit available to private employers. The FFCRA became effective April 1, 2020, and will expire at the end of the year. It is enforced by the WHD. Continue reading

DOL Issues Regulations and More Guidance About Paid Sick Leave and Expanded Family and Medical Leave Under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

An update to this post was published April 22

On April 6, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Wage and Hour Division (WHD) published a temporary rule regarding the new Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). It contains temporary regulations to implement the FFCRA, which are effective from April 2, 2020, through December 31, 2020.  In addition to the actual regulations, which are found in part 826 of title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, the rule contains background and discussion sections which provide additional guidance. The temporary regulations address many of the issues discussed in the DOL’s series of questions and answers that it has been publishing regarding the FFCRA.

Before the publication of the temporary rule, on April 1, 2020, the DOL’s WHD published another series of questions and answers to provide additional guidance regarding the protections and relief offered by the FFCRA.

As noted in our recent blog post, the FFCRA provides expanded paid and unpaid family and medical leave broader than the current Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and paid sick leave to certain employees affected by COVID-19. In addition, it provides help for individuals and businesses impacted by the pandemic—like reimbursement through a refundable tax credit available to private employers. Continue reading

Governor Clarifies Florida Safer-at-Home Order

An update to this post was published April 15.

Late on Friday, Florida’s Governor issued clarifications through a List of FAQs regarding the Safer-at-Home Executive Order 20-91, which became effective at 12:01 a.m. April 3, 2020, as noted in our recent blog post and is currently scheduled to expire on April 30, 2020.

The FAQs explained that notwithstanding that persons in Florida who are senior citizens or individuals with a significant underlying medical condition are ordered to “stay at home and take all measures to limit the risk of exposure to COVID-19,” they may leave their homes as necessary to obtain or provide essential services or conduct essential activities, including but not limited to going to work at an essential service. Continue reading

IRS Guidance Regarding Tax Credits for Paid Leaves; the Families First Coronavirus Response Act; and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act

The IRS has provided some guidance regarding the process for employers to obtain the tax credits provided for in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (“CARES”) Act. The FFCRA tax credits are to reimburse small and midsize employers for amounts paid to employees that qualify for and use the new paid sick and/or paid family leave provisions of the FFCRA. The guidance for these credits, which is presented as Basic Frequently Asked Questions (“FAQ”), provides details on how employers start claiming the credits, what documentation the employer must retain to substantiate eligibility, and how to determine the amount of the tax credits for qualified leave wages. The FAQ also briefly addresses the interplay between the FFCRA tax credits and the CARES tax credit. View the FAQ.

Similar guidance is available for the CARES Act’s Employee Retention Credit. This credit is 50% of up to $10,000 in wages paid by an eligible employer whose business has suffered financially due to COVID-19 and is available to all eligible employers regardless of size. Employers who have taken a small business loan under the Act’s Paycheck Protection Program are not, however, entitled to this credit. More information and an FAQ is available from the IRS.

Government employers are not entitled to either the FFCRA tax credits or the CARES tax credit.

Williams Parker has launched a multidisciplinary task force of lawyers across the firm to advise on issues arising from COVID-19 and to provide guidance for affected clients. This team is closely monitoring legal developments and guidance from federal, state, and local government and public health officials. For the latest updates, please visit our website.

Corporate and tax attorney Christina J. Strasser contributed to this post. 

DOL Issues New and Revised Guidance About Paid Sick Leave and Expanded Family and Medical Leave Under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

An update to this post was published April 22.

This post was updated April 3. Updates are shown in red.

On March 28, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Wage and Hour Division (WHD) published further guidance regarding the protections and relief offered by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), which takes effect today, April 1, 2020. This guidance is provided through a series of questions and answers.

As noted in our recent blog posts, the FFCRA provides expanded paid and unpaid family and medical leave broader than the current Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and paid sick leave to certain employees affected by COVID-19. In addition, it provides help for individuals and businesses impacted by the pandemic—like reimbursement through a refundable tax credit available to private employers. Continue reading

Unemployment Provisions in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act

As businesses in Florida make decisions on how to move forward during the COVID-19 public health emergency, many businesses are weighing the effects of a layoff or furlough on their employees’ ability to secure unemployment benefits. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (“CARES”) Act—which was signed into law the afternoon of March 27, 2020—includes provisions that address these issues. These provisions are referred to as the Relief for Workers Affected by Coronavirus Act.

Before addressing how the CARES Act may temporarily affect unemployment, it is important to understand what steps the State of Florida has already taken. At this stage, Florida has temporary made individuals who have a COVID-19-related unemployment situation eligible for reemployment assistance (the name Florida gives to unemployment benefits). Specifically, under current Florida guidance, the following persons are currently eligible for COVID-19 unemployment benefits:

  • People ordered to quarantine by a medical professional
  • Those laid off or sent home without pay for an extended period by their employer due to COVID-19
  • Those caring for an immediate family member with the virus.

Continue reading