Category Archives: Uncategorized

Amounts Paid to Employees for Sick and Family Leave Wages Are to be Reported on W-2s

Yesterday, July 8, 2020, the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) issued Notice 2020-54, which provides guidance to employers on reporting qualified sick and family leave wages paid to employees under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Enacted this past March 2020, the FFCRA generally requires employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide paid leave due to certain circumstances related to COVID-19.  Notice 2020-54 directs employers to “separately state” each of the paid sick and family leave wage amounts either in Box 14 of Form W-2 or in a statement that accompanies the Form W-2.

The guidance provides employers with adaptable model language for use in the Form W-2 instructions for employees. An excerpt of that language is as follows:

“Included in Box 14, if applicable, are amounts paid to you as qualified sick leave wages or qualified family leave wages under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Specifically, up to three types of paid qualified sick leave wages or qualified family leave wages are reported in Box 14:

  • Sick leave wages subject to the $511 per day limit because of care you required;
  • Sick leave wages subject to the $200 per day limit because of care you provided to another; and
  • Emergency family leave wages.”

The Notice goes on to state that the wage amount required to be reported by employers on Form W-2 will provide self-employed individuals who are also employees with the information necessary to determine the amount of any sick and family leave equivalent credits they may claim in their self-employed capacities. We recommend that employers review the Notice’s model language for their Form W-2 instructions.

You’re Invited! Practical Planning for Your Legacy: Understanding Your IRA


We would be delighted if you could join us for our upcoming seminar for those seeking guidance with IRA planning. Williams Parker attorneys Colton F. Castro and Alyssa L. Acquaviva will provide the necessary knowledge to enable IRA account owners to make informed decisions about how to structure their estate plan and IRA beneficiary designations in a manner that best fits tax planning and personal goals.

Wednesday, March 27, 2019
8:30 – 10 a.m.
Art Ovation Hotel
1255 North Palm Avenue, Sarasota, FL 34236

TOPICS INCLUDE:

  • Wealth management strategies for IRA account owners
  • Minimum required distribution requirements and timing
  • Tax penalties and how to avoid them
  • Tax laws regarding the inheritance of IRAs, including rollovers and beneficiary designations
  • Charitable planning involving IRAs
  • Structuring an estate plan to maximize the benefits available to IRA account owners and their beneficiaries
Admission is complimentary and breakfast is provided; however, space is limited.

 

Please feel free to share this information with anyone who may be interested and please contact us with any questions. We hope to see you there!

Business Tax Changes Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

The Tax Act passed at the end of 2017 brought with it a number of changes to how businesses both big and small are to be taxed moving forward. While the most visible change has been the lowering of the corporate tax rate to a flat 21 percent rate, most businesses should be able to find additional benefits from changes in how business equipment is to be depreciated, how net operating losses can be carried forward into future years, and what improvements to non-residential real property are eligible for an immediate deduction.

A recent presentation given to FICPA discusses the aspects of the Tax Act, other than the Qualified Business Income Deduction, which are most likely to affect the tax savings of your business.

Jamie E. Koepsel
jkoepsel@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2562

Section 1059A – A Trap for the Unwary?

Our community is near multiple major ports, including Port Manatee and the Port of Tampa.  Taxpayers that import goods through these ports should be aware of U.S. tax issues that can arise from their actions.  U.S. taxpayers that import goods from related parties outside the United States have several tax rules to consider in setting their transfer prices and reporting income, including the transfer pricing regimes in both the importing and exporting jurisdictions.  Among the U.S. tax rules that such importers must consider is a lesser-known Internal Revenue Code section, Section 1059A.

Section 1059A provides that the maximum amount a U.S. taxpayer may claim as basis in inventory goods imported from a related party is the amount that was determined for customs purposes when the goods were imported.  The statute is designed to prevent taxpayers from claiming low values for customs purposes (reducing the amount of U.S. customs duties owed) and high values for transfer pricing purposes (reducing the amount of U.S. taxable income).

A trap for the unwary can occur when related parties retroactively modify their intercompany pricing after goods are imported.  For example, a U.S. company may increase the amount paid for an imported good at the end of the year in order to satisfy the arm’s length standard for transfer pricing purposes.  This additional amount is generally be subject to customs duties, but reporting additional customs duties can fall through the cracks if a company’s personnel responsible for tax and customs compliance do not communicate regarding the adjustment.  In addition, even where additional amounts are reported for customs purposes, the timing of an upward adjustment in the customs price could prevent taxpayers from including the adjustment in the basis of the inventory for tax purposes if the adjustment is made after the customs value has been “finally-determined” (generally, 314 days after the date of entry).  These issues may frequently arise when taxpayers retroactively adjust transfer prices in accordance with Advance Pricing Agreements.

In recent years, practitioners have called for better coordination between the Internal Revenue Service and U.S. Customs and Border Protection along with reforms to eliminate the potential whipsaw of Section 1059A.  It remains to be seen whether current tax reform proposals will reach this issue.

Nicholas A. Gard
ngard@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2563

Follow-Up to Florida Sales Tax Rate on Commercial Leases is Reduced

We previously blogged that the Florida Legislature enacted a reduction to the state sales tax rate on commercial real property leases from 6% to 5.8% effective January 1, 2018. The language of the new statute is unclear as to whether the rate decrease would apply to current leases. However, we have confirmed with a representative of the Florida Department of Revenue that they interpret the rate reduction as applying to current leases for periods after December 31, 2017.

Michael J. Wilson
mwilson@williamsparker.com
941-536-2043