Category Archives: Charitable Giving

How the 2020 Election Might Impact Federal Gift and Estate Tax Law

There has been a lot of discussion about the impact that the upcoming election might have on federal gift and estate tax law. In light of this, we feel that it would be helpful to provide an update of the current situation and a brief summary of some of the planning opportunities that may be beneficial in the current environment. We also want to highlight the recent passage of the SECURE Act and discuss the impact this new law might have on your estate plan.

The current available estate and gift tax exemption is $11.58 million. Generally speaking, this is the amount that can be transferred during lifetime (by gift) or at death before transfer tax is imposed. Under current law, this exemption amount is tied to the rate of inflation and is therefore likely to gradually increase through 2025. If Congress does not act in the interim, then on January 1, 2026, the estate and gift tax exemption will reduce to $5 million, as indexed for inflation.

The Internal Revenue Service issued final Treasury regulations confirming that taxable gifts made between 2017 and 2026, in excess of the exemption amount available on the date of death, will not be “clawed back” into the gross estate for federal estate tax purposes. In other words, if a taxable gift of $11 million is made this year, and in the year of the transferor’s death the exemption amount is $5 million, the transferor’s estate will not pay transfer tax on the excess $6 million that was gifted when the exemption amount was $11 million. The anti-clawback regulations provide unique tax planning opportunities to lock in the temporary increase in the exemption via gifting prior to its reversion.

Since the upcoming elections may yield a political shift in both the executive and legislative branches, the estate and gift tax exemption might be adjusted prior to January 1, 2026. There is also discussion that such a political shift could lead to the imposition of an additional tax on unrealized appreciation upon the transfer of assets by gift or at death and an increase in both marginal gift and estate tax rates. Obviously, we do not know what the upcoming election holds, and we do not know what legislation might be passed in the coming years. Regardless, it seems prudent for those who potentially might have a taxable estate to monitor the situation and consider whether they wish to avail themselves of any planning opportunities before any possible changes are made.

Given the current situation, most people are drawn to strategies that allow them to make a gift in a manner that will (1) lock in the current $11.58 million exemption amount; (2) remove assets, and the appreciation thereon, from their gross estate; and (3) retain some use of the gifted assets after the gift. Some popular strategies that meet these criteria are as follows:

Spousal Lifetime/Limited Access Trust (SLAT): A SLAT is an irrevocable trust established by someone for the benefit of his or her spouse. The general concept is that the gifted SLAT funds remain available for the spouse (and possibly children) during the spouse’s lifetime. A SLAT is structured so that it does not qualify for the marital deduction; thus it utilizes the transferor spouse’s exemption. During the beneficiary spouse’s lifetime, the beneficiary spouse retains use of the funds. When the beneficiary spouse dies, however, such access is lost, and the trust assets are distributed or held in further trust for designated beneficiaries.

Many people like to maximize this strategy by having both spouses create SLATs for the benefit of each other. This is permitted; however, such SLATs must be carefully structured to include enough differences so as not to be deemed reciprocal trusts.

Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT): A GRAT is an irrevocable trust that is established for a specific term of years. During the term, the grantor retains the right to receive an annual payment from the trust. The term of the GRAT and the amount of the payment can be modified based on how much of the exemption the grantor wishes to utilize. As long as the assets in the GRAT appreciate greater than the Section 7520 rate (currently only 0.4 percent), then there will be assets that can pass to beneficiaries tax-free at the end of the term. A grantor who wishes to utilize a larger portion of his or her exemption through a GRAT would reduce the size of the annual payment that comes back during the term of the GRAT.

Qualified Personal Residence Trust (QPRT): A QPRT is an irrevocable trust funded with the grantor’s personal residence (or secondary home) in which the grantor retains the right to use the residence for a term of years. Upon the expiration of such term (if the grantor survives the term), the ownership of the property will pass to the remainder beneficiaries, either outright or subject to continuing trust.

The establishment of a QPRT will be deemed a taxable gift of the remainder interest to the trust beneficiaries. The value of the taxable gift will be the overall fair market value of the transferred property reduced by the value of the retained interest (i.e., the term of years selected). This allows the grantor to transfer the full value of the residence using only the exemption equal to the value of the remainder interest. After the term of the QPRT ends, the grantor may lease the property back from the remainder beneficiaries for fair market value.

The federal income tax consequences of the aforementioned trusts should also be considered. Each of the trusts, at least for a period of time, is structured as a “grantor trust,” which means that the grantor is taxed on all the income earned by the trust during such time period. This may be beneficial because the income taxes paid by the grantor serve as an additional transfer of wealth to the beneficiaries, free of transfer tax. Another important income tax consequence is that when a gift is made during life, the recipient of the gift receives a “transferred basis” in the asset. This means that the recipient of the gifted asset has the same basis in the asset that the transferor held. Alternatively, if an asset is transferred upon death, the recipient’s basis would be adjusted to the asset’s fair market value, which is generally more desirable for income tax purposes. Therefore, the specific assets utilized for any gifting strategy must be carefully considered.

This is not an exhaustive list of options. For example, those who do not care to retain any interest in the gifted assets can continue to utilize outright gifting directly to a beneficiary or to a trust for the benefit of one or more beneficiaries. The gifted assets could consist of closely held business interests, which might qualify for a valuation discount. If you have previously loaned money to a beneficiary, you might consider forgiving the note and thereby triggering a gift. Some clients are also looking to refinance existing loans at lower current applicable rates. You should speak with your estate planning attorney to determine which techniques are appropriate for you. There are a multitude of options, depending on your intent, family structure, asset holdings, and market outlook.

The SECURE Act and Its Impact

In addition to the possible changes to the transfer tax rules, the recent passage of the SECURE Act has caused a major change in how many retirement plans can be administered and distributed following the account owner’s death. Many of such plans are now subject to a 10-year payout requirement after the death of the account owner. Previously, such accounts could generally be paid out over the life expectancy of the named beneficiary. For many plans, this change will result in an acceleration of the income tax liability following the account owner’s death. Therefore, we also suggest that you review your retirement accounts and the named beneficiaries of such accounts to ensure that the treatment of such assets after your death is consistent with your intent.

If you would like to review the options available in further detail, or if you simply feel that it may be beneficial to review your estate plan in light of the SECURE Act or our uncertain political and estate tax environment, please feel free to contact us. We will be happy to help you protect your intent and preserve your estate for you and your family. 

Why Individuals Should Care About the CARES Act: Retirement Plans and Charitable Contributions

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”) provides various relief provisions for individuals, including provisions that benefit individuals in relation to their retirement plans and that provide an increase in allowable charitable deductions. Continue reading

Charitable Giving Under the New Tax Act – The Standard Deduction Bump

One of the more visible changes from the Tax Act will be the increase in the standard deduction. When completing an annual tax return, a taxpayer has the choice to either take a standard deduction or to itemize deductions. The standard deduction is a flat dollar amount which reduces your taxable income for the year, with the same standard deduction amount applying to every taxpayer who takes the standard deduction. The itemized deduction instead allows a taxpayer to deduct a number of different expenses from throughout the year, including certain medical expenses, mortgage interest, casualty and theft losses, state and local taxes paid, and charitable contributions. Whether a taxpayer uses the standard deduction or itemizes his or her deductions will depend on whether that taxpayer’s itemized deductions exceed the standard deduction amount.

In 2017, the standard deduction amount was $6,350 for single taxpayers and $12,700 for married taxpayers filing jointly. The Tax Act has nearly doubled these amounts for 2018, with the standard deduction increased to $12,000 for single taxpayers and $24,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly. Limitations have also been placed on deducting state and local taxes (capped at $10,000) and on mortgage interest (limited to new loans, capped at $750,000).

Taxpayers now have a higher standard deduction amount they need to pass before itemizing their deductions and they have more limited expenses available in order to get over that bar. Fewer people will be generating the expenses needed to make itemizing deductions worthwhile. The Tax Policy Center estimates that the percentage of taxpayers itemizing deductions will drop from 30% to only 6%.

If fewer taxpayers are itemizing their deductions, the tax benefits of charitable giving will be available to fewer taxpayers. The Tax Policy Center estimates charitable giving to drop anywhere from $12 billion to $20 billion in the next year. Taxpayers may instead bunch their charitable gifts into a single year, itemizing their deductions in such a year while using the standard deduction in subsequent years rather than spreading out these gifts over a stretch of years.

People charitably give to their favorite organizations out of a humanitarian desire to help less fortunate people and to benefit the wider community; a smaller tax incentive will not change this. But the smaller tax incentive is expected to have a negative impact both for a taxpayer’s ability to deduct charitable gifts and for the amount of gifts charitable organizations expect to receive.

Jamie E. Koepsel
jkoepsel@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2562

Welcome the New Year With Our Updated Tax Reform Review

On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law the most important rewrite of the US tax code in decades. The federal law, which is entitled “An Act to provide for reconciliation pursuant to titles II and V of the concurrent resolution of the budget for the fiscal year 2018” (the Act), has no other name, as its short title, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, was stricken from the bill shortly before being signed.

We have prepared a summary of the Act as a non-exhaustive discussion of key changes to the tax code. We will continue to analyze the Act and will post updates and recommend planning strategies on this blog.

For more information regarding the Act, please see our previous related blog posts linked below:

On behalf of everyone at Williams Parker, we hope you and your family have a healthy and happy 2018.

Please note this post was co-authored by Elizabeth Diaz, Colton Castro, and Nicholas Gard. 

Elizabeth P. Diaz
ediaz@williamsparker.com
941-329-6631

Colton F. Castro
ccastro@williamsparker.com
(941) 329-6608

Nicholas A. Gard
ngard@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2563

Rethinking Large 2017 Year-End Charitable Gifts

With the standard exemption increasing and federal income tax rates generally falling in 2018, accelerating charitable gifts into 2017 may seem like a no-brainer. You might want to think twice if you plan a large charitable gift.

Under current law, the income tax charitable deduction and many other itemized deductions gradually phase out as income increases above $313,800 for married jointly filing taxpayers. The phase out continues until the deductions are reduced by 80%.

The just-enacted Tax Cuts and Jobs Act suspends this limitation, allowing charitable and other itemized deductions without the income-based phase out.  This could cause a 2018 charitable gift to produce a more valuable tax benefit than a 2017 gift, particularly for large gifts.

If you are unsure how to proceed, ask your CPA to run the numbers in both scenarios.  Better to wait a year for the deduction, than to receive a much smaller benefit than you expected.

For more information regarding the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, follow these LINKS:

https://blog.williamsparker.com/businessandtax/2017/12/18/whats-tax-reform-bill/

https://blog.williamsparker.com/businessandtax/2017/12/18/reform-business-tax-reform/

https://blog.williamsparker.com/businessandtax/2017/12/19/2017-year-end-planning-art-equipment-non-real-estate-1031-exchanges/

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037