Tag Archives: Wage Theft Ordinances

Wage Theft Ordinances: Dandelions in the Spring

“Wage theft” ordinances have been popping up in Florida like dandelions in the spring. At first glance, these ordinances look like a lovely spring flower providing employees an administrative and/or legal avenue to recover unlawfully withheld wages. However, these ordinances are really weeds causing headaches not only to employers, but also to employees who are not prepared to navigate the unique procedures for making such claims. A growing list of municipalities, including Miami-Dade County, Broward County, City of St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, and Hillsborough County, have all implemented some variety of a wage theft ordinance, and there is a lack of uniformity among procedures and rules for bringing claims pursuant to these ordinances. Companies operating in one or more of these areas should be aware of the additional regulations that may apply to their businesses, some of which call for triple damages and attorneys’ fees. This task can be quite daunting for any company that operates statewide or in two or more of the participating municipalities. Now, in addition to defending wage claims under the Fair Labor Standards Act, Florida Minimum Wage Act, Florida Statute Section 448.08, and common law unjust enrichment claims, companies will also be defending claims brought pursuant to these ordinances and sometimes will be defending such claims in two different forums, possibly at the same time.

Knowledge of these ordinances can serve as legal Roundup to help employers defeat attempts by employees to obtain damages. This is best evidenced by Green v. Stericyle, Inc., No. 1:16-CV-24206-CMA (S.D. Fla. Dec. 15, 2016), a case in which an employee brought a wage theft claim that was dismissed by the court because the employee failed to comply with the prescribed procedure. The ordinance did not grant an initial private right of action, but rather provided an exclusive administrative procedure to bring the claim to the county. The employee failed to follow the administrative procedure, thereby compelling the court to dismiss the case. As this case illustrates, although emergence of wage theft ordinances causes problems for employers, the onus remains with the employee to navigate a municipal code to bring a proper claim. Failure to do so could be fatal to the claim.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Florida and Several of Its Cities will Ride the 2017 Wave of Minimum Wage Hikes

During the course of 2017, 21 states including Florida, plus the District of Columbia (D.C.), are increasing their minimum wage rates for nonexempt employees. Florida, along with 18 other states, increased its minimum wage as of January 1, 2017. As discussed here, Florida increased its minimum wage to $8.10. Maryland, Oregon and D.C. are set to raise their respective minimum rates in July 2017.

Several cities in Florida are also set to raise minimum wages above Florida’s minimum wage. For example, as of October 1, 2017, the City of West Palm Beach’s minimum wage rises by $1.00 per hour to a new minimum of $14.25, and then to $15 in fiscal year 2018-2019. On January 1, 2018, the City of Miami Beach’s minimum wage is set to increase to $10.31 and ultimately to $13.31 over a four-year cycle. There are other cities in Florida that either have approved or are also contemplating similar increases.

This is an important juncture for Florida employers, especially those who employ low-wage workers affected by the new minimum wage changes, to carefully audit their pay practices to ensure legal compliance. In addition to federal, state and even local minimum wage laws, many Florida counties and cities (for example Miami-Dade, West Palm Beach, and St. Petersburg) have wage theft ordinances designed to protect employees wages. Employee claims alleging violations of local, state, or federal wage and hour laws can be costly and significantly affect a company’s bottom line. Despite minimum wage increases at the state and local level, the federal minimum wage has remained stagnant at $7.25 per hour since 2009. Employers should be aware that where several different minimum wages may apply, the employer must pay the higher wage rate.

2.2% of Florida wage earners, or approximately 187,000 employees, are expected to receive pay raises due to the state minimum wage adjustment. About 4.4 million employees are expected to benefit from state minimum wage increases nationwide.

The states’ minimum wage increases and resultant minimums vary quite dramatically when compared on a national scale. At the low-end, for example, is Florida’s five cents ($0.05) per hour increase which raises the state minimum wage from $8.05 to $8.10. This matches the five cent increase in Alaska (to $9.80), in Ohio (to $8.15 ) and in Missouri (to $7.70). By contrast, at the high-end of the spectrum is Arizona with a $1.95 per hour increase to a new minimum wage rate of $10.00, followed by Maine with a $1.50 per hour increase to a new minimum of $9.00, Washington state with a $1.53 per hour increase to a new minimum of $11, and Massachusetts with a $1.00 per hour increase to a new minimum of $11 per hour.

John M. Hament
jhament@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2555