Tag Archives: Puzder

Going into Overtime in the Search for a Secretary of Labor: What is Next for the 2016 Overtime Rule?

For weeks now, rumors have been circulating that the President’s nominee for Secretary of Labor, Andrew Puzder, would withdraw his name. As his confirmation hearing was delayed over and over again (five times), he repeatedly issued statements that he was fully committed to becoming Secretary of Labor and looking forward to his confirmation hearing. However, yesterday, on the eve of his scheduled appearance for questioning before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions, he issued a statement withdrawing his name for consideration.

As detailed in a previous blog post, Mr. Puzder is a fast-food executive who many believed would run the Department of Labor in a pro-business manner. Thus, labor organizations were greatly opposed to the President’s nominee and view his withdrawal as a win for workers.

This afternoon, it was announced that the President has selected former U.S. Attorney R. Alexander Acosta to serve as Secretary of Labor. Acosta is a former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, a former member of the National Labor Relations Board, and a former assistant attorney general in the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division. He currently serves as the dean of Florida International University College of Law. Acosta has a very different background from the prior nominee.

If confirmed, it is not yet clear what approach Acosta will take in handing the pending appeal of the stay imposed on the 2016 overtime rules. The original briefing deadline on appeal was delayed as a result of the DOL’s request for additional time “to allow incoming leadership personnel adequate time to consider the issues.” The existing briefing deadline is currently March 2, 2017. It is possible that the administration will request additional time from the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals now that Puzder has withdrawn his name and Acosta is the new nominee. Oral argument has not been set.

Even though oral argument has not been set in the appeal, Washington is not taking a break from focusing on this issue. Today, a subcommittee of the House Education and the Workforce Committee is holding a hearing on “Federal Wage and Hour Policies in the Twenty-First Century Economy.” It is anticipated that the stayed overtime rule will take center stage at this hearing.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558