Tag Archives: overtime regulations

BREAKING NEWS: Overtime Rules Overruled

Employers, the wait is over. You finally have an answer regarding the 2016 overtime regulations. Yesterday afternoon, a Texas federal judge issued an order invalidating the U.S. Department of Labor’s overtime rules that had been set for implementation on December 1, 2016, but preliminarily stopped nationwide only days before by that same judge.

As noted in our earlier blog posts (“Breaking News: Federal Judge Halts Implementation of the DOL’s New Overtime Regulations” from November 23, 2016 and “2016 Overtime Regulations: They Are Still Out There” from June 13, 2017), the DOL had issued a final rule that was predicted to affect over 4.2 million workers, with Florida as the third most effected state. Those workers would no longer be exempt from overtime compensation due to increases in the minimum salary level for “white collar” exemptions from $455 per week ($23,660 annually) to $913 per week ($47,476 annually) and highly compensated employees from $100,000 to $134,000 annually.

The DOL quickly appealed the preliminary injunction to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which left employers wondering whether the hold would be lifted by the appellate court or the appeal withdrawn. The uncertainty increased on July 25, 2017, when the DOL published a formal Request for Information so the DOL could issue a new proposal related to overtime regulations.

In the order, the court granted summary judgment to the business group and other plaintiffs who had challenged the new overtime rules and issued a final judgment on their behalf. The court held that the white collar exemptions were intended to apply to employees who perform “bona fide executive, administrative, or professional capacity” duties, and that the DOL does not have the authority to use a salary-level test that will effectively eliminate the duties test or exclude those who perform the duties based on salary level alone.  Because the new overtime rules would have “exclude[d] so many employees who perform exempt duties” and are “not based on a permissible construction of [the law]”, the DOL did not carry out Congress’s unambiguous intent, exceeded its authority, and has “gone too far” with the rules.  In sum, the overtime rules have been overruled, and may be disregarded by employers.

Read the full order here.

Gail E. Farb
gfarb@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2557

2016 Overtime Regulations: They Are Still Out There

Like a science fiction television show from the 90s, the 2016 overtime regulations are still out there, as is the injunction preventing their implementation. To bring those that may just be returning from Close Encounters of the Third Kind up to date, in the latter part of 2016 employers rushed to get ready for December 1, 2016, the effective date for the regulations. On November 22, 2016, just days before the effective date and as employers scrambled to make their final preparations for the changes, a federal judge blocked the implementation. With the speed of Quicksilver, the Obama administration initiated an appeal. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals granted expedited review of the injunction, and many anticipated witnessing The War of the Worlds play out during oral argument. Then, as if a spacecraft had landed in Roswell and this time everyone stopped to watch the aliens disembark, the momentum came to a crashing halt just like a hirsute alien spacecraft piloted by Jeff Goldblum.

Shortly after President Trump took office, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) requested a postponement of its deadline to submit a reply brief. This request was granted. Just as that deadline was filed, the DOL again requested a postponement. Currently, the DOL’s reply brief is due on June 30, 2017. Although the new Administration could have withdrawn the appeal, it has not. Therefore, there still may be a chance for a strategic showdown such as that seen in Pixels.

Going into Overtime in the Search for a Secretary of Labor: What is Next for the 2016 Overtime Rule?

For weeks now, rumors have been circulating that the President’s nominee for Secretary of Labor, Andrew Puzder, would withdraw his name. As his confirmation hearing was delayed over and over again (five times), he repeatedly issued statements that he was fully committed to becoming Secretary of Labor and looking forward to his confirmation hearing. However, yesterday, on the eve of his scheduled appearance for questioning before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions, he issued a statement withdrawing his name for consideration.

As detailed in a previous blog post, Mr. Puzder is a fast-food executive who many believed would run the Department of Labor in a pro-business manner. Thus, labor organizations were greatly opposed to the President’s nominee and view his withdrawal as a win for workers.

This afternoon, it was announced that the President has selected former U.S. Attorney R. Alexander Acosta to serve as Secretary of Labor. Acosta is a former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, a former member of the National Labor Relations Board, and a former assistant attorney general in the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division. He currently serves as the dean of Florida International University College of Law. Acosta has a very different background from the prior nominee.

If confirmed, it is not yet clear what approach Acosta will take in handing the pending appeal of the stay imposed on the 2016 overtime rules. The original briefing deadline on appeal was delayed as a result of the DOL’s request for additional time “to allow incoming leadership personnel adequate time to consider the issues.” The existing briefing deadline is currently March 2, 2017. It is possible that the administration will request additional time from the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals now that Puzder has withdrawn his name and Acosta is the new nominee. Oral argument has not been set.

Even though oral argument has not been set in the appeal, Washington is not taking a break from focusing on this issue. Today, a subcommittee of the House Education and the Workforce Committee is holding a hearing on “Federal Wage and Hour Policies in the Twenty-First Century Economy.” It is anticipated that the stayed overtime rule will take center stage at this hearing.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558