Tag Archives: labor and employment

FMLA: Forgetting Minutiae Lead to (legal) Actions (Part IV)

Resuming our journey through the complex maze that is the Family and Medical Leave Act, we turn now to address – through a series of questions and answers – important aspects of FMLA when employees are dealing with their own serious health conditions (when they cannot perform their essential job functions) or the serious health conditions of their spouses, parents, or children. Previously, we addressed aspects of FMLA leave (i.e., up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave during the year) for employees who are expanding their family through births, adoptions, or foster child placement.

So, employees are entitled to FMLA leave if they have a serious health condition?

Correct.

And, they can take leave when a spouse, parent, or child has a serious health condition?

Again correct. Employees can also take leave to care for their spouse, parent, or child with a serious health condition.

What about grandparents or siblings?

Generally, no. Employees are not entitled to FMLA to care for grandparents or siblings or cousins or really any other family member other than their spouse, parent, or child. However, if a grandparent acted in loco parentis (acts as a parent) to the employee before the employee was of age, then FMLA leave could be taken.

I noticed that you italicized the phrase “serious health condition” above, was there a reason for doing that?

Yes, we were trying to draw your attention to that phrase because it has a special meaning under the FMLA.

What does it mean?

It means an illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition that involves (1) inpatient care, or (2) continuing treatment by a health care provider.

What is considered inpatient care?

Inpatient care means that the person receiving treatment has to stay overnight in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility.  It also includes periods of incapacity or subsequent treatment that’s connect to the overnight stay.

And, what do you mean by “continuing treatment by a healthcare provider”?

That phrase refers to any of the following types of ongoing treatment: incapacity and treatment, pregnancy or prenatal care, chronic conditions, permanent or long-term conditions, and conditions requiring multiple treatments.

You did that italicizing thing again with the word incapacity.

Yes, we did.  That’s because the word incapacity also has a special meaning.

What is the special meaning for incapacity?

An incapacity means an inability to work, attend school, or perform other regular daily activities due to the serious health condition, treatment of the serious health condition, or recovery from the serious health condition, which lasts longer than three days.

Are there any limits on what’s included in the incapacity period?

Yes. To qualify for FMLA coverage, the incapacity must also involve:

  • Treatment two or more times by a health care provider, under the supervision of a healthcare provider, or due to a referral by a health care provider, within 30 days of the first day of incapacity; or
  • Treatment by a health care provider on at least one occasion, which results in a regimen of continuing treatment under the supervision of the health care provider.

So, does a period of incapacity require a visit with a health care provider?

Yes.

Who qualifies as a healthcare provider?

Health care providers include professionals who you would normally think about, like doctors of medicine or osteopathy (authorized by the State in which the doctor practices), podiatrists, dentists, optometrists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, or clinical psychologists.

Is that all?

No. Under the FMLA, a healthcare provider can also include chiropractors (limited to treatment consisting of manual manipulation of the spine to correct a subluxation as demonstrated by X-ray to exist), nurse-midwives, clinical social workers, or any healthcare provider that an employer or the employer’s group health plan’s benefits manager accepts to certifying for purposes of a benefit claim that the individual has a serious health condition.

Going back to the period of incapacity lasting more than three days, are there any additional requirements involved with that period?

There are. The first (and sometimes only) in-person treatment visit with a healthcare provider must happen within seven days of the first day of incapacity.

Can you have partial day incapacities that count towards that original three-day requirement?

No, partial days of incapacity cannot be combined to satisfy the requirement that the incapacity extend more than 3 days or 72 hours.

Can an employee receive FMLA leave if they schedule all of their routine physical exams over three days and miss three full days of work?

No. The treatment at issue does not include routine physical examinations, eye examinations, or dental examinations. The treatment protected by the FMLA is generally limited to examinations to determine if a serious health condition exists and evaluations of that condition.

You mentioned earlier that the requirement for continuing treatment by a healthcare provider includes treatment for pregnancy or prenatal care, right?

Yes, it does. However, a pregnant employee can still be entitled to FMLA leave if the employee does not receive medical treatment for the absence. For example, a pregnant employee unable to report to work because of severe morning sickness would be entitled to FMLA for that absence.

You mentioned that chronic conditions can be a qualify reason, what are those?

A chronic serious health condition is one which:

  • Requires periodic visits for treatment by a health care provider, or by a nurse under direct supervision of a health care provider;
  • Continues over an extended period of time (including recurring episodes of a single underlying condition); and
  • May cause episodic rather than a continuing period of incapacity.

How periodic must a visit be?

It must be at least twice a year.

Are there examples of conditions that may cause episodic rather than continuing periods of incapacity?

Yes, those types of conditions may include asthma, epilepsy, diabetes, and similar types of conditions.

So, diabetes can be considered a chronic condition for which employees may use FMLA leave?

Yes, if it requires in-patient care or if it requires an employee go to the doctor at least twice a year.

Now, what about permanent or long-term conditions, must there be active treatment for all covered absences?

No. Although the individual suffering from a permanent or long-term condition must be under the continuing supervision of a health care provider, that individual is not required to receive active treatment during each covered absence.

Are there any examples of these types of conditions?

Examples of permanent or long-term conditions that fall in this category include Alzheimer’s, a severe stroke, or the terminal stages of a disease.

What types of conditions requiring multiple treatments would qualify for FMLA leave?

Either, restorative surgery after an accident or other injury; or a condition that would likely result in a period of incapacity of more than three consecutive, full calendar days in the absence of medical intervention or treatment, such as cancer (chemotherapy, radiation, etc.), severe arthritis (physical therapy), or kidney disease (dialysis).

As noted above, the first post in our series on FMLA summarized the steps an employer should follow when dealing with the FMLA labyrinth and addressed which employers are covered by the Act. The second post explained which employees are eligible for FMLA leave. The third post addressed FMLA leave for the birth or adoption of a child. The next post in the FMLA series will address the qualifying reasons arising from issues specific to military members and their families.

Special thanks to Associate John Getty for his assistance with this blog post.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Restrictions on Vaping and Texting Go Into Effect: Today is Gonna be the Day That the Florida Legislature Is Gonna Throw It Back to Employers*

By now you should’ve somehow realized that today (July 1, 2019) the amendment to the Florida Clean Indoor Air Act, which implements the 2018 constitutional amendment prohibiting vaping in the workplace, goes into effect.

Hopefully, businesses and employers realize what they have gotta do now that the use of e-cigarettes in indoor workplaces is prohibited. The word is on the street that indoor workplaces will become an oasis for non-smokers – who likely never really had a doubt that that the fire in the hearts of vaping employees would eventually go out.

Employers can no longer choose to allow employees to vape indoors. Those using e-cigarettes will now be relegated to designated smoking areas–-presuming employers provide smoking areas. Although we don’t believe any vaping employees will feel that great about this decision now, it is the law, and maybe it’s gonna be something that saves them.

Beyond that, all roads that employees have to drive are winding, and now all the lights from their cellphones won’t be blinding. Because, as of today, texting while driving has become a primary offense rather than being a secondary offense. There are many things that we’d like to say about this, but primarily, this means employee drivers can be pulled over for texting while driving without violating any other traffic law. Maybe, this will be a law that saves people.

Regardless, employers will need to throw it back to employees who are driving while working, and make sure that they somehow realize what they’re not to do. We don’t believe that any managers should refrain from training their subordinates and requiring employees to avoid texting-and-driving. That way, the managers can also be the ones who save their employee drivers and protect their employers’ businesses. Read more about the new texting law.

Both of these laws—after all—could have positive consequences on the health and well-being of workers and be the laws that save them.

* see ”Wonderwall” Oasis 1995

Special thanks to Associate John Getty for his assistance with this blog post.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

FMLA: Forgetting Minutiae Leads to (legal) Actions (Part III)

After providing a general overview of the convoluted maze that is the FMLA, explaining  which employers are subject to the FMLA, and describing which employees are eligible for leave, we now continue our journey by addressing when an employee can take FMLA.

Eligible employees of covered employers may take up to 12 workweeks of leave during any
12-month period for one, or more, of the following reasons:

1. The birth of the employee’s son or daughter, or to care for the newborn child.
2. For placement with the employee of a son or daughter for adoption or foster care.
3. To care for the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent with a serious health
condition.
4. Because of a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the functions of the employee’s job.
5. Because of any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse,      son, daughter, or parent is a military member on covered active duty (or has been notified of an impending call or order to covered active duty status).

These reasons—along with a few others involving military service members that we will address in a future blog post—are known as “qualifying reasons” under the FMLA. Some of these qualifying reasons are straightforward while others involve important nuances. For today’s post, we’re going to address the issues that come up with points 1 and 2 above (the birth, adoption, or fostering of children) through another series of questions and answers.

I have an employee who qualifies for FMLA leave, and the employee is about to have a new child. What rights does that employee have?

As noted above, an employee who qualifies for FMLA can take up to 12 workweeks of leave during a 12-month period for the birth or care of a newborn child.

Does an employee have to take all the qualifying leave at one time?

It depends. An eligible employee may use intermittent or reduced schedule leave after the birth of a healthy child or placement of a healthy child for adoption or foster care, but only if the employer agrees.  If the employer does not agree, then the time off will be all at one time.

Does an employee need to take all of their FMLA leave for the birth of the child right after the child is born?

Not necessarily, an employee can take leave for the birth of a child any time up to 12 months after the child’s birth.

 Are both parents entitled to leave for the birth of their child?

Generally, both parents are entitled to leave for the birth of the employee’s child. However, if both spouses work for the same employer, the total combined leave taken by both spouses for the birth of the child or to care for the child after birth may be limited to a combined total of 12 weeks of leave during any 12-month period. In other words, both spouses have 12 weeks combined for the newborn child. Thus, the mother and father could both take 6 weeks each. Or the mother could take 9 weeks, and the father 3 weeks. Alternatively, if the mother takes 12 weeks, then her spouse would not be entitled to any FMLA leave.

Where both spouses use a portion of the total 12-week FMLA leave entitlement for the birth of a child, each spouse would be entitled to the difference between the amount he or she has taken individually and 12 weeks for FMLA leave for other purposes.

The foregoing is also true for the placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care. For purposes of the FMLA, a spouse includes a married husband or wife (husband or wife refers to the other person with whom an individual entered into marriage), which includes same-sex spouses.

As noted above, the first post in our series on FMLA summarized the steps an employer should follow when dealing with the FMLA labyrinth and addressed which employers are covered by the Act. The second post explained which employees are eligible for FMLA leave. The next FMLA post in this series will address the qualifying reasons involving an employee’s own serious health condition or the serious health condition of family members.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Planning for Hurricane Season: Employee Pay During and After a Storm

With the onset of the 2019 hurricane season and the effects of Hurricanes Michael and Irma still being felt by many, employers have a number of concerns. These concerns range from preparing facilities to determining whether a business will stay open. At some point, after decisions have been made about whether a business will stay open and if goods or people need to be moved out of harm’s way, the questions relating to employee pay may arise.

One question that is frequently asked is “Should I pay exempt employees who miss work due to bad weather conditions?” When it comes to deductions from exempt employees’ salaries, it is easy to get into trouble. The general rule is that an exempt employee is entitled to receive his or her entire salary for any workweek he or she performed work. This means, if the work site closes for a partial week due to bad weather conditions (such as a hurricane) and the exempt employee has worked during that workweek, the employee is entitled to his or her full salary. However, if the employer has a leave benefit, such as PTO, and the employee has leave remaining, the employer can require the employee to use paid time off for this time away from work. If the employee does not have any remaining leave benefit, he or she must be paid.

If the work site remains open during inclement weather and an employee is absent (even if due to transportation issues), the employee can be required to use paid time off. If the employee does not have any paid time off remaining, the employer may deduct a full-day’s absence from the employee’s salary. For a more detailed explanation visit dol.gov.

Other issues that arise relate to what constitutes compensable time for non-exempt employees. The FLSA only requires that non-exempt employees be paid for the hours they actually work. However, those non-exempt employees on fixed salaries for fluctuating workweek(s) must be paid their full weekly salary in any week for which work was performed. Further, those businesses, such as hospitals and nursing homes that remain open during a storm and require employees to remain onsite during the storm may have to pay employees required to be onsite during a storm for all time they are at the employer’s place of business, as they may be considered to be “on call.”

It is important for businesses to start planning in advance for the next hurricane. Such plans should include evaluating which employees may be required to continue working during a storm and what portion of their time during a storm is considered compensable.

Healthcare employers also have ACHA rules to comply with relating to storm preparation (not specifically related to employee compensation). For further information on these regulations see my colleague Steven Brownlee’s article, “Senior Living Providers: Are You Ready for Andrea, Barry, and Chantal?

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558

Avoiding Errors in the Match Game: Responding to the Rising Number of “No-Match” Letters

Starting late last year and continuing on the heels of tax season, the Social Security Administration (SSA) has been sending employers Employer Correction Request Notices, also known as EDCOR notices or “no-match” letters. An example “no-match” letter is available at the SSA’s website. These “no-match” letters notify an employer that the information submitted on an employee’s W-2, such as the Social Security Number or SSN, does not match the SSA’s records. Even though it’s not conclusive evidence that an employee is not authorized to work in the United States, it can put an employer on notice of a possible issue, which can lead to potential compliance issues and liability under federal law. See our previous discussion here and here on recent Form I-9 compliance issues.

Of course, common discrepancies can also trigger a “no-match” letter, such as  unreported name changes, typos or input errors by the SSA, reporting errors by an employer or employee, errors in recognizing multiple last names or hyphenated last names, or identity theft.

In other words, “no-match” letters can arise because of simple administrative errors. Employers should not presume the “no-match” letter conveys information about an employee’s immigration status or authorization to work within the United States. Still, the “no-match” letters may also indicate that an individual provided false identification.

Employers must be cautious when dealing with a “no-match” letter. An overreaction—such as requesting excessive or unnecessary documentation from employees—can violate the anti-discrimination provisions in federal law, which generally prohibit discriminatory employment practices because an employee’s national origin, citizenship, or immigration status. Thus, an employer should not attempt to do any of the following after receiving a “no-match” letter:

  • Take any adverse employment action against an employee subject to a “no-match” letter, including—but not limited to—firing, demoting, cutting hours, reducing the wages of, or writing up such an employee;
  • Follow different procedures for different classes of employees based on the employees’ respective national origin or citizenship status;
  • Require the employee immediately provide a written report that the SSA verified the requisite information (primarily because the SSA may not ever provide such a report);
  • Immediately reverify the employee’s eligibility to work by requesting a new Form I-9 based solely on the “no-match” letter; or
  • Require an employee produce any specific I-9 documents, such as a Social Security card, to address the no-match issue.

The question then becomes: How should employer respond to a “no-match” letter?

Unfortunately, the letters usually do not identify the employees for whom the SSA finds there is a “no-match” issue. To determine which employees’ information is at issue, an employer must first register with the SSA’s Business Service Online website. Through that website, an employer can then compare the employee names and SSN information in its files against the SSA’s records to make sure the information was correctly submitted, and no typographical error occurred. If an employer determines it misreported the information, it can issue a correction through an updated IRS Form W-2C. An employer generally has 60 days from receipt of the “no-match” letter to issue a Form W-2C to make corrections if that is the cause of the “no-match.”

Should an employer determine that it properly reported the information, then the employer will need to further investigate and may want to seek guidance from counsel before taking further action.

John C. Getty
jgetty@williamsparker.com
(941) 329-6622

No Fooling: DOL Proposes New Rule to Determine Joint-Employer Status

As a rule of thumb, skepticism is in order for any news blasted out on April Fool’s Day. For that reason, you could easily believe that the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) was joining in the tomfoolery this year when it issued a new Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on April 1, 2019 to address joint employment under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), but, that wasn’t the case.

Through its April 1, 2019 notice, the DOL seeks to revise regulations on joint employment issues. A joint employer is any additional individual or entity who is equally liable with the employer for the employee’s wages, including minimum wages and overtime. Presently, the regulations state that multiple persons or companies can be joint employers if they are “not completely disassociated” with respect to the employment of an employee. The phrase “not completely disassociated” is not clearly explained in the regulations, which has led to thorny issues when dealing with the employees of subcontractors, franchisees, and similar relationships.

To address such issues, the DOL proposes a four-factor analysis that considers whether the employer actually exercises the power to:

  • Hire and fire an employee;
  • supervise and control an employee’s work schedules or conditions of employment;
  • determine the employee’s rate and method of payment; and
  • maintain the employee’s employment records.

The DOL indicates that there are other factors that should and should not be considered. It also clarifies certain business models and practices or contractual language that does not make a joint employer status more or less likely. A Fact Sheet issued with this proposed rule does a fair job of summarizing the other factors. For example, the DOL indicates that just because a company reserves the right in a contract to exercise control over another company’s workers does not—by itself—make a company more or less likely to be considered a joint employer. Rather, a company must actually exercise the contractual control to become a joint employer. Likewise, the DOL notes that just because a company can require another contracting party to institute anti-harassment policies, workplace safety measures, or wage floors does not make it more or less likely the two companies are joint employers.

The April 1, 2019 notice began the notice-and-comment process. The DOL will accept comments from interested parties for 60 days. The public will be able to provide electronic comments at www.regulations.gov (after searching for RIN no. 1235-AA26) or via mail addressed to:

Division of Regulations, Legislation, and Interpretation
Wage and Hour Division
U.S. Department of Labor, Room S-3502
200 Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

(identifying in the written comment (1) the Wage and Hour Division, United States Department of Labor; and (2) RIN no. 1235-AA26).

John Getty
jgetty@williamsparker.com
(941) 329-6622

FMLA: Forgetting Minutiae Leads to (legal) Actions – Part II

As we continue through the convoluted maze of arcane rules known as the FMLA, we turn our focus to what makes an employee eligible for FMLA leave.

Generally, an employee of a covered employer is eligible to take FMLA leave, if the employee satisfies three requirements. They are:

(1)  the employee has been employed by the employer for at least 12 months;

(2)  the employee has been employed by the employer at least 1,250 hours of service during the 12-month period immediately preceding the commencement of the leave; and

(3)  the employee is employed at a worksite where 50 or more employees are employed by the employer within 75 miles of the worksite.

These requirements do not apply to flight attendants and flight crew members. Persons in such positions are subject to special eligibility requirements that are not covered in this series.

Although these three requirements may seem pretty straightforward, they are not as clear cut as they appear. Accordingly, below you will find a few questions and answers designed to assist in understanding the concept of the “covered employee.”

Does the 12 months of service have to be consecutive?

No. The 12 months of service need not be consecutive. Generally, any combination of 52 weeks equals 12 months. Even so, a seven year break in service with the employer generally cuts off any prior service except in certain limited circumstances. Such circumstances include, but are not limited to, military service covered by The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 (USERRA) or written agreement, including a collective bargaining agreement.

When should it be determined if the employee meets the months of service requirement?

The determination of whether an employee has been employed by the employer for a total of 12 months must be made as of the date the FMLA leave is to start.

How are the hours of service calculated?

The FLMA’s definition of “hours of service” applies for the calculation of 1,250 hours. Accordingly, hours of service does not include those hours for which an employee is paid but does not work, such as holidays, paid vacation, and sick leave. Hours worked does include time worked as a part-time, temporary, or seasonal employee.

An employee returning from USERRA-covered military service is credited with the hours of service that would have been performed but for the period of absence from work due to or necessitated by USERRA-covered service in determining the employee’s eligibility for FMLA-qualifying leave.

If an issue arises with respect to employee coverage, the Department of Labor takes the position that the employer has the burden of showing that the employee has not met the hours of service requirement.

When should it be determined if the employee meets the hours of service requirement?

The determination of whether an employee meets the hours of service requirement must be made as of the date the requested FMLA leave is to start.

How does an employer determine if there are 50 employees within a 75-mile radius of employee’s worksite?

First, it has to be determined where the employee’s worksite is. An employee’s worksite is the site where an employee reports. If the employee does not travel to a specific location to work, then the worksite is the location from where the employee receives assignments.

For employees with no fixed worksite (e.g., construction workers, transportation workers, salespersons), the worksite is the site that is assigned as their home base, from which their work is assigned, or to which they report. With very few exemptions, an employee’s personal residence is not considered a worksite.

The 75-mile distance is measured by surface miles, using surface transportation over public streets, roads, highways, and waterways, by the shortest route from the facility where the employee needing leave is employed.

While public-sector employers are covered regardless of the number of employees employed, to be an eligible employee entitled to take FMLA leave, the public-sector employee must still be employed at a worksite in which the employer employs at least 50 employees within a 75-mile radius.

When should an employer determine if there are 50 employees within a 75-mile radius of employee’s worksite?

The determination of whether 50 employees are employed within 75 miles of the worksite is made when the employee gives notice of the need for leave.

What happens when an employee does not meet all three requirements until after the employee’s need for leave has begun?

An employee’s full FMLA rights are triggered as of FMLA eligibility. An employer cannot designate leave happening before the eligibility date as FMLA leave; and therefore, the employee becomes entitled to the full 12 weeks of FMLA leave in addition to any previously taken leave.

The first post in our series on FMLA summarized the steps an employer should follow when dealing with the FMLA labyrinth. The next FMLA posts in this series will address the FMLA’s original qualifying reasons for leave and then the qualifying reasons added in 2008.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Another Business Resolution: Conduct a Pay Audit in 2019

Pay Audits are different from wage and hour audits. A wage and hour audit looks at whether employees are being paid in compliance with state and federal wage and hour laws. A pay audit reviews whether there may be discrimination in pay practices within an organization. With the #metoo movement and a renewed focus on pay gaps, an internal review of pay practices could save a business from liability under the primary statutes used to combat discriminatory pay gaps – Title VII, the Florida Civil Rights Act, and the Equal Pay Act.

As with other types of claims brought under state and federal discrimination statutes, a claim of disparate pay based on any protected characteristic is subject to the same administrative filing requirement and provides the same remedies as a wrongful termination case. On the other hand, under the Equal Pay Act (which only covers disparities based on gender), there is not an administrative filing requirement, and the definitions and statute of limitations for an employee to bring a claim is the same as those in place for the Fair Labor Standards Act. Further, Equal Pay Act claims do not require proof of intent to discriminate on the part of the employer. And, not having intent as a requirement makes it easier for an employee/former employee to establish a prima facie case. Under the Equal Pay Act, an employee need only show that she works at the same location, performs substantially equal work (regardless of job title), works under substantially equal working conditions, and is paid less than a male counterpart.

In a perfectly competitive labor market, the value an employee contributes to a business should determine that employee’s wage. However, in the real world, there are disparities of income that may be due to differences in labor productivity, and there are wage disparities across genders and ethnicities. When it comes to gender, disparities may be due to:

  • Compensating wage differentials: men may be employed in more dangerous or “dirty” jobs that pay more
  • Choice of college major and choice of career
  • Time constraints: mothers may have only limited time to pursue career advancement
  • Different negotiating skills of men and women
  • The number of years of work experience
  • The number of years in continuous employment
  • The number of hours spent at work
  • Employer discrimination

As set forth above, employer discrimination is only one of several reasons why a gap may exist and employers may have pay gaps that are based on non-discriminatory reasons.  Both the civil rights statutes and the Equal Pay Act provide several defenses to claims of discriminatory pay. Employers can avoid liability by proving the pay differential is due to one of the following reasons:

  • Seniority System
  • Merit Pay System
  • System that measures quality or quantity of work
  • Factor based on any factor other than sex  (this is considered a “catch all” defense)

It is good for employers to be aware of any gaps that exist in its pay practices and understand why they exist. When an employer does not have an explanation, that is when litigation and potential liability can ensue. Below are a few ways that businesses can help prevent (and if necessary defend) discrimination in pay claims:

  • Evaluate all forms of compensation (starting salary, benefits, bonuses, shift differentials, overtime, training opportunities, separation pay, etc.) at least annually for potential pay disparities based on race/ethnicity and gender
    • Evaluate how pay raises and bonuses are determined to ensure that decisions are made in a non-discriminatory manner.
    • Evaluate how you assign your employees to specific jobs.
    • Focus on job recruitment, placement and how pay is assigned to job classes.
  • In addition to an annual assessment, throughout the year conduct periodic “spot” checks for potential compensation problems.
  • Correct problems as soon as they are discovered.
  • Evaluate how women and minorities are placed in your workforce. Do not make assumptions about what they can or cannot do.
    • Does your hiring process seek diversity in the qualified applicant pool?
    • Do you offer career training or opportunities for both genders?
    • If starting salaries and signing bonuses are negotiated, ensure that such a practice does not have an adverse impact on women or minority workers.
    • Evaluate whether all workers have equal opportunity for advancement. Placing one gender in areas that lead to greater advancement could be a violation of law.
  • Periodically review your performance evaluation process and the ratings given to each employee to determine whether the process or the ratings unfairly disadvantage women, or any other protected classes.

This post is part of a series of business resolutions to consider for the new year. In case you missed them, our previous posts in the series discussed Florida minimum wageemployee performance management, and employee handbook/wage audits.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Business Resolutions: Ensuring Your Business Starts the New Year Off Right

When was the last time that your business had a wage audit to evaluate whether your employees are properly classified under the Fair Labor Standards Act, or had your employee handbook reviewed and revised to bring it up-to-date with the law and current company practices? If it has been a few years, then this may be the year that your business resolves to invest in a wage audit and/or handbook review.

Wage audits include an evaluation of your job positions, pay and overtime policies, as well as payroll records of each position within an organization or department. Sometimes, audits can also include interviews with employees to ascertain if there are any issues that management should be aware of. Audits can reveal if a business has any issues with, not only misclassification of employees as exempt when they should be non-exempt, but whether managers are following the organization’s policies regarding overtime. As a company grows and changes, often the duties of its employees also change. Sometimes these changes are significant enough that a change in classification is in order and a failure to adjust the classification could result in liability. Further, a wage audit can often help to determine if an organization’s accountant or payroll company is calculating overtime in accordance with the applicable regulations. Many a lawsuit are filed against employers who believe that since they have enlisted the assistance of a third party, employee overtime is being calculated appropriately. That is not always the case.

Employee handbooks should be reviewed every couple of years, not only to ensure that the handbook reflects the current state of the law, but also that it reflects the actual practices of a company. Businesses grow and change, and actual practices can start to diverge from what is reflected in the handbook. It is always better to have a handbook that provides policies and procedures that the company is currently using and enforcing. It is never recommended for a company to have policies that it does not follow.

This post is part of a series of business resolutions to consider for the new year. In case you missed them, our previous posts in the series discussed Florida minimum wage and employee performance management.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Another Business Resolution: Ensure Your Business Implements Florida’s New Minimum Wage

The next suggested resolution in our series of business resolutions is one that all businesses in Florida should implement, as it is legally required. On January 1, 2019, Florida’s minimum wage will increase from $8.25 to $8.46 an hour. Employers should be prepared to make appropriate pay adjustments for their minimum wage earners. Failing to pay non-exempt employees Florida’s statutory minimum wage can result in claims against employers pursuant to Section 24, Article X of the State Constitution and Section 448.110, Florida Statutes. The maximum tip credit ($3.02) that can be taken by Florida employers with tipped employees will remain the same, but the direct wage paid to tipped employees will increase from $5.23 to $5.44 an hour.

In addition to raising the minimum wage, Florida employers are required to post a minimum wage notice in a conspicuous and accessible location. You can download the 2019 Florida Minimum Wage Notice from the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity’s website. This notice requirement is in addition to the requirement that employers post regarding the federal minimum wage (which has not been increased). There will also be commercially available Florida-specific “all-in-one posters” that satisfy both the federal and state notice requirements.

In case you missed it, our first business resolution of this series covered employee performance management.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558