Tag Archives: labor and employment

A Clue to the NLRB’s Future Focus?

In regulatory action last week, the current board of the National Labor Relations Board not-so-subtly identified several areas where the Board wants to reverse course. Specifically, on October 16, 2018, the Board’s General Counsel released four advice memorandums issued during the Obama administration addressing several topics, including dress codes, replacement of striking employees, and video recordings of workplace strikes.

It is uncommon for advice memos to be released, especially those from prior administrations.  Most times, such releases happen after a matter has been resolved or the General Counsel has directed a region to dismiss a case. When memos are released, it is because the Board wants to draw attention to a trending topic or point of emphasis. In this instance, the Board released advice memos that were quite favorable to labor unions and workers:

  • In two advice memos involving Walmart dating to 2013, the Board’s General Counsel at that time recommended that the regional director bring unfair labor practices when the retailer (1) told a plainclothes security guard that he could not wear union clothing while undercover; and (2) prohibited workers from wearing union insignia shirts and then disciplined them for engaging in a work stoppage (which the General Counsel opined was not an unprotected sit-in strike);
  • In a different 2013 memo, the General Counsel found that Boeing acted unlawfully when it recorded union solidarity marches that happened on its property while it also had a rule in its employee handbook that blocked employees from using cameras on its property; and
  • In another advice memo issued in early 2017, the then-General Counsel concluded a California fishery committed an unfair labor practice when it unlawfully replaced striking employees by giving temporary employees permanent positions.

These memos are noteworthy since the current General Counsel, Peter Robb, and the Board at large are unlikely to support the positions espoused in the Obama era memos. For instance, in December 2017, the Board has changed course in the Boeing matter, concluding that the Board’s previous edicts on handbooks gave too much credence to employees’ rights and too little to employers’ interests.

Considering the reversal in Boeing matter, the fact that the General Counsel released the other advice memos on the same day potentially signals those advice memos do not reflect the Trump-era General Counsel or Board’s position. For that reason, employers may wish to challenge similar unfair labor practice findings in other settings.

Still, although these advice memos may be a relic of the Obama-era Board, another administration’s Board could renew the legal theories and positions contained in the advice memos. Thus, at the very least, employers should remain mindful of the views taken in the advice memos and consider potential protective steps.

John Getty*
jgetty@williamsparker.com
(941) 329-6622
*Admitted in Louisiana and Georgia

The NLRB Shifts its Strategy in its Attempts to Change the Joint-Employer Standard

After a failed attempt to change the joint-employer standard through legal decision arising out of a pending case before the NLRB, on September 14, 2018, the National Labor Relations Board (the “Board”) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in the Federal Register regarding its joint-employer standard. The proposed rule would overturn the standard set by the Board in Browning-Ferris, 362 NLRB No. 186 (2015) to determine if an employer is a joint employer. Under the Browning-Ferris standard, the inquiry turns on whether the alleged joint employer had the potential to control aspects of the workplace, either directly or indirectly, regardless of whether the employer actually exercised that authority.

The proposed rule would revert to the pre-Browning-Ferris standard for determining whether an employer will be considered a joint employer of a separate employer’s employees. Under this proposed rule, an employer may be considered a joint-employer of another employer’s employees only if it possesses AND exercises substantial, direct, and immediate control over the essential terms and conditions of employment and has done so in a manner that is not limited and routine. This would effectively reverse the Browning-Ferris standard and render indirect influence and contractual reservations of authority insufficient to establish a joint-employer relationship.

The 60-day period for public comments on this proposed rule began on September 14, 2018, and continues through November 13. After the Board receives and reviews the public comments and replies, it will issue a final rule regarding the joint employer standard. If issued without substantial changes, this rule would be great news for employers as this stricter standard is clearer, provides more consistency, and reduces the likelihood of an employer inadvertently becoming a joint employer.

Ryan P. Portugal
rportugal@williamsparker.com
941-329-6626

Planning for the Next Hurricane: Employee Pay During and After a Storm

With the onset of the 2018 hurricane season and the effects of Hurricane Irma still being felt by many, employers have a number of concerns. These concerns range from preparing facilities to determining whether a business will stay open. At some point, after decisions have been made about whether a business will stay open and if goods or people need to be moved out of harm’s way, the questions relating to employee pay may arise.

One question that is frequently asked is “Should I pay exempt employees who miss work due to bad weather conditions?” When it comes to deductions from exempt employees’ salaries, it is easy to get into trouble. The general rule is that an exempt employee is entitled to receive his or her entire salary for any workweek he or she performed work. This means, if the work site closes for a partial week due to bad weather conditions (such as a hurricane) and the exempt employee has worked during that workweek, the employee is entitled to his or her full salary. However, if the employer has a leave benefit, such as PTO, and the employee has leave remaining, the employer can require the employee to use paid time off for this time away from work. If the employee does not have any remaining leave benefit, he or she must be paid.

If the work site remains open during inclement weather and an employee is absent (even if due to transportation issues), the employee can be required to use paid time off. If the employee does not have any paid time off remaining, the employer may deduct a full-day’s absence from the employee’s salary. For a more detailed explanation visit dol.gov.

Other issues that arise relate to what constitutes compensable time for non-exempt employees. The FLSA only requires that non-exempt employees be paid for the hours they actually work. However, those non-exempt employees on fixed salaries for fluctuating workweek(s) must be paid their full weekly salary in any week for which work was performed. Further, those businesses, such as hospitals and nursing homes that remain open during a storm and require employees to remain onsite during the storm may have to pay employees required to be onsite during a storm for all time they are at the employer’s place of business, as they may be considered to be “on call.”

It is important for businesses to start planning in advance for the next hurricane. Such plans should include evaluating which employees may be required to continue working during a storm and what portion of their time during a storm is considered compensable.

Heathcare employers also have new ACHA rules to comply with relating to storm preparation (not specifically related to employee compensation). For further information on these regulations see my colleague Steven Brownlee’s recent article, “Senior Living Providers: Are you ready for the Beryl, Chris, and Debby?

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558

Seminar: What’s a Business to Do in the Age of #MeToo?

In light of all of the attention that is being focused on issues relating to harassment and the #MeToo movement, it is now more important than ever for businesses to develop a better understanding of what constitutes harassment in the workplace.

Join us Wednesday, April 11, at the Lakewood Ranch Business Alliance’s upcoming seminar featuring Williams Parker board certified labor and employment attorney Jennifer Fowler-Hermes. Jennifer will discuss types of harassment and provide guidance on how employers can prevent, recognize, and respond to harassment.

WHEN:
Wednesday, April 11, 2018
7:30-8:00 a.m. Networking & Breakfast
8:00-9:00 a.m. Presentation

WHERE:
Keiser University
6151 Lake Osprey Drive
Sarasota, FL 34240

COST:
$10 Members, $20 Non-members

Register Online

MORE ON #METOO:
Catch Williams Parker labor and employment attorney Gail Farb discussing the #MeToo movement on a recent ABC7 news TV segment and roundtable discussion.

Intro Segment (Gail first appears at 2:31):

Roundtable Discussion (Gail first appears at 2:55).