Tag Archives: I-9

Form I-9 Audits Soared in Fiscal 2018 – Be Ready for More of the Same! (Part II)

As we mentioned in Part I of this post, this year the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) will continue to focus on the use of Form I-9 audits and other strategies to encourage employers’ compliance with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA).

How do employers know if Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) has initiated an audit or administrative inspection of their businesses? The inspection process begins with HSI serving a Notice of Inspection (NOI) on an employer compelling production of Forms I-9 and frequently other supporting documentation such as payroll reports, a list of current employees, articles of incorporation, and business licenses. Employers have at least three business days to produce the Forms I-9, after which HSI will conduct an inspection for compliance following ICE’s inspection process, give the employer 10 days to correct technical or procedural violations, and assess applicable fines and penalties.

Form I-9 best practice tips for employers include:

  • Establish a uniform written Form I-9 compliance policy and train staff accordingly.
  • Avoid discrimination claims by educating staff on the appropriate way to verify documents and treat all job applicants the same regardless of their citizenship or immigration status or their national origin.
  • Put in place a “tickler” system to notify HR staff of upcoming re-verifications for individuals that possess temporary employment authorization.
  • Establish a best practice method for proper cataloging and retention of Forms I­-9—separate former and active employees’ Forms I-9.
  • Keep Forms I-9 organized and separate from general personnel files. Establish a consistent policy regarding obtaining and retaining copies of verified documents.
  • Purge old Forms I-9s that are past the retention period on an annual basis (three years from date of hire or one year after termination, whichever is longer).
  • Conduct routine formalized self-audits and document each internal audit, preferably with guidance from legal counsel.
  • Call legal counsel immediately if you are served with a Notice of Inspection as the time to respond is short and it is critical to submit well-organized documents only after receiving legal advice.
  • Do not consent to an immediate inspection if agents arrive without warning – employers have three days to submit documents.
  • Only submit what is requested – nothing extra.
  • Do not let agents take original records without retaining copies.
  • Do not allow agents to talk with any employees or company officers before contacting legal counsel.
  • If the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) agents arrive for an inspection of Forms I-9 without notice, decline the inspection. They will notify ICE.  (Note – if DOL agents seek to inspect wage and hour or FMLA records, decline the inspection and contact your legal counsel to schedule it at a convenient time.)
  • If U.S. Department of Justice Immigrant and Employee Rights Section (IER) agents arrive for an inspection of Forms I-9 without notice or deliver notice of intent to conduct a worksite enforcement audit, call legal counsel immediately to help coordinate a response. See also IER’s Employer Best Practices During Worksite Enforcement Audits.

Gail E. Farb
gfarb@williamsparker.com
941-552-2557

Form I-9 Audits Soared in Fiscal 2018 – Be Ready for More of the Same!

In 2019, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) will continue to focus on the use of Form I-9 audits and civil fines to encourage employers’ compliance with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA), along with criminal prosecution of employers who knowingly violate IRCA.

Last year ICE I-9 audits increased by 340 percent, resulting in 779 criminal arrests of employers; 1,525 administrative arrests of unauthorized employees; and more than $10.2 million in judicial fines, forfeitures, and restitutions. While most employers do not intentionally falsify Forms I-9 or knowingly accept fraudulent documents from employees, employers’ honest mistakes related to Forms I­9 can be costly. Civil fines, per form with one or more mistakes, range from $216 to $2,156. Thus, the same mistake made on each form could increase the fine exponentially. Moreover, do not forget that the U.S. Department of Justice Immigrant and Employee Rights Section (IER) also conducts Form I-9 audits to ensure that businesses are not engaging in citizenship discrimination.

Employers should protect their businesses by ensuring Form I-9 compliance programs are in place, up-to-date, and followed. For instance, employers should confirm they are using the current form, which has an August 31, 2019 expiration date, and properly following the instructions. Take care to avoid common Form I-9 mistakes, such as an employee’s failure to sign or date the form or the employer’s failure to complete Section 2 by the third business day after the date the employee begins employment. For guidance from ICE regarding Form I-9, visit “I-9 Central” or review ICE’s list of Common Mistakes and How to Avoid Them.

Also, employers should conduct routine Form I-9 internal audits and properly remedy identified errors in order to be legally compliant and to help avoid liability should ICE or IER select your company for an inspection. See Guidance for Employers Conducting Internal Employment Eligibility Verification Form I-9 Audits.

In the next couple of weeks, part II of this post will address the ICE inspection process.

Gail E. Farb
gfarb@williamsparker.com
941-552-2557

The Form I-9 Changes Yet Again

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has issued yet another revision to the Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification. The previous version was imposed on employers less than a year ago (released November 14, 2016; effective date January 22, 2017), and now that employers are finally getting accustomed to the version released in November, they must quickly adapt to the even newer Form I-9, as its use is mandatory effective September 18, 2017.

The revised Form I-9, which you can download from USCIS is a modest update to the Form I-9 dated November 14, 2016. In the revised Form I-9 instructions, the name of the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices has been changed to reflect its new name, Immigrant and Employee Rights Section. Less notably, in the instructions, “the end of” has been removed from the phrase “the first day of employment.”

The List of acceptable documents has received some minor updates as well. The Consular Report of Birth Abroad (Form FS-240) has been added to list C and will now be selectable from the drop-down menus available in List C of Sections 2 and 3. It will also be available for selection for E-Verify users when creating a case for an employee who has presented this document for Form I-9. Additionally, the certifications of report of birth issued by the Department of State (Form FS-545, Form DS-1350, and Form FS-240) have been combined into selection C#2 in List C, and with the exception of the Social Security card, all List C documents have been renumbered.

USCIS has included these changes in the revised Handbook for Employers: Guidance for Completing Form I-9 (M-274).

This post was co-authored by Jennifer Fowler-Hermes and Ryan P. Portugal.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Ryan P. Portugal
rportugal@williamsparker.com
(941) 329-6626

Successfully Transitioning Employees When Implementing a Business Succession Plan

When a business succession plan includes the transition of employees from one employer to another, it is important for businesses to recognize that there are a host of employment issues that need to be addressed during the transition. From determining whether a sufficient number of employees will be hired by the new employer to avoid the requirements of the WARN Act (if applicable), to whether the new employer will require transitioned employees to complete new applications, background checks, or I-9 forms, it is important to have a well-organized plan. A human resources transition checklist that details the mandatory and suggested labor and employment items to be managed by those implementing the transition is a helpful tool in ensuring that the transition is smooth for both the businesses involved as well as the affected employees.

Advance planning is helpful to a smooth transition. To learn more about business succession planning, check out our colleague John Wagner’s recent interview with the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, in which he addresses why and when business owners should consider succession planning and provides tips for getting started.

This video was originally posted on The Williams Parker Business & Tax Blog. To read more and to subscribe, visit http://blog.williamsparker.com/businessandtax/.

Related Resources:

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Oh Joy! A Holiday Gift From U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services: A New I-9 Form

Just in time for the holiday season the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services published a revised form I-9. If you forgot, this form is used to verify the identity and employment authorization of individuals that are hired for employment. Now, in addition to the traditional “print and complete” version, an electronic version is available that will detect when a required portion has not been completed. This new form, however, does not have instructions on it. Don’t you just love when new toys do not come with instructions? Luckily the instructions have not been forgotten, merely transported into a separate document that is a whopping 15 pages long.

The new form has several differences from its predecessor. For instance, the translator certification is no longer on the form, but is now a supplement to the form. As a consequence, it is important that those in your organization responsible for any part of the I-9 process become familiar with the changes before January 22, 2017, when employers are required to use the “new and improved” I-9 form. The form can be downloaded here, and the instructions can be downloaded here.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558