Tag Archives: FLSA

Proposed Changes to the Department of Labor’s Tip Pooling Rules

Yesterday, the U.S. Department of Labor published a Notice of Proposed Rule Making (“NPRM”) to alter limitations on tip pooling when an employer does not take a tip credit and pays the tipped employees a direct cash wage of at least the federal minimum wage. According to a DOL fact sheet on the NPRM:

As the NPRM explains, since 2011, there has been a significant amount of litigation involving the tip pooling and tip retention practices of employers that pay a direct cash wage of at least the federal minimum wage and do not claim a Fair Labor Standards Act tip credit. There has also been litigation directly challenging the department’s authority to promulgate the provisions of the 2011 regulations that restrict an employer’s use of tips received by its employees when the employer pays a direct cash wage of at least the federal minimum wage and does not take a tip credit. Moreover, in the past several years, several states have changed their laws to require employers to pay tipped employees a direct cash wage that is at least the federal minimum wage. This means that fewer employers can take the FLSA tip credit. The department is issuing this NPRM in part because of these developments and the department’s serious concerns that it incorrectly construed the statute when promulgating the 2011 regulations.

The proposed rule would allow employers to distribute customer tips to larger tip pools that include non-tipped workers, such as cooks and dishwashers. This would likely increase the earnings of those employees who are newly added to the tip pool and further incentivize them to provide good customer service. The proposed rule would additionally provide employers greater flexibility in determining pay practices for tipped and non-tipped workers. It also may allow for a reduction in wage disparities among employees who all contribute to the customers’ experience.

This proposed change does not impact tip pooling when an employer takes a tip credit toward the minimum wage requirement. Employers impacted by this proposed rule have until January 4, 2018, to provide comment on the rule. Comments may be submitted electronically at regulations.gov.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558

Should I Pay Exempt Employees Who Miss Work Due to Bad Weather Conditions?

As Florida prepares for a potential direct hit by Hurricane Irma, employers have many concerns. At some point, when decisions have been made about if a business will stay open and if goods or people need to be moved out of harm’s way, the following question will most likely be asked: “Should I pay exempt employees who miss work due to bad weather conditions?”

When it comes to deductions from exempt employees’ salaries it is easy to get into trouble.  The general rule is that an exempt employee is entitled to receive his or her entire salary for any workweek he or she performed work. This means, if the worksite closes for a partial week due to bad weather conditions (such as a hurricane), and the exempt employee has worked during that workweek, the employee is entitled to his or her full salary. However, if the employer has a leave benefit, such as PTO, and the employee has leave remaining, the employer can require the employee to use paid time off for this time away from work. If the employee does not have any remaining leave benefit, he or she must be paid.

If the work site remains open during inclement weather and an employee is absent (even if due to transportation issues), the employee can be required to use paid time off.  If the employee does not have any paid time off remaining, the employer may deduct a full-day’s absence from the employee’s salary. For a more detailed explanation see this opinion letter from the U.S. Department of Labor.

As for non-exempt employees, the FLSA only requires that employees be paid for the hours they actually work. However, those non-exempt employees on fixed salaries for fluctuating workweeks, must be paid their full weekly salary in any week for which work was performed.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558

Guidance for Employers from the Dark Side?

A long time ago in what seems like a galaxy far away, Congress passed the National Labor Relations Act. Since then, Congress has continued to pass laws governing the employee/employer relationship. In 1938, it passed the Fair Labor Standards Act; in 1964, it passed the Civil Rights Act; and in 1993, it passed the Family and Medical Leave Act. These acts and many others can make businesses feel like they have been thrown into a trash compacter or frozen in carbonate. Management attorneys, a.k.a the light side of the force, provide guidance and counsel to businesses and assist in navigating these laws which seem to appear and/or change as if powered by a hyper drive. On Thursday, April 27, from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at Michael’s on East in Sarasota, businesses will have an opportunity to learn about recent developments and current trends related to wage and hour compliance, employee criminal conduct, and sexual orientation and gender identity not only from their Jedi, but also from a Sith, a.k.a. a plaintiff’s employment attorney. It is not often that businesses have an opportunity to learn from both sides of the Force.

This seminar will provide guidance in important areas of employment law to assist professional service providers in their role as employers. The workshop will include best practices from legal compliance and human resources perspectives, and will conclude with a Sith providing insight into employers’ mistakes that strengthen the dark side. This seminar is intended to be an interactive presentation with the aim of providing solutions to troublesome employment issues confronting law firms and other professional service providers. To learn more about this event and to register, visit the Sarasota County Bar Association website.

Disclaimer: This seminar does not have a Star Wars theme; I just watched The Force Awakens on HBO this weekend.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Office Holiday Parties: Avoiding the Naughty List

pexels-photoIf you have not yet seen the movie Office Christmas Party, watch the trailer and you will see a perfect example of what not to do at your annual office holiday party. The Mad Men days of the secretary sitting on Santa’s lap (the boss’s lap) while both are drinking a dry martini SHOULD be a vestige of the past. Most employers and employees now recognize that in today’s world there is a different expectation as to how to behave appropriately at work then there was in say the 1950s or 1960s. However, social norms that are generally recognized in the workplace sometimes are forgotten when there is a party, especially a party with libations. A holiday office party can embolden inappropriate behavior from simple innuendos to unwelcome touching. The office holiday party can be a quagmire of potential employment issues, even beyond sexual harassment, including but not limited to, workers compensation, the Fair Labor Standards Act, and religion.

As this holiday season heads into full throttle, it is important for employers to consider the potential risks associated with any planned celebration. Consider whether alcohol should be available, as most issues arise due to someone “bending the elbow” a bit too much. If you do decide to provide spirits, make sure you have someone (a designated responsible adult) that is monitoring to ensure that your workforce does not get too “relaxed” and cross the line. Possibly limit how much alcohol is served and make sure any employee that drinks a little too much has a ride home. Evaluate in advance whether the party is going to be mandatory or not. If it’s voluntary and employees do not feel compelled to attend, then employers are not required to compensate employees for their attendance. Review the plans for the party in advance to see if there are any activities that could be considered inappropriate or offensive to members of any protected class. Finally, make sure that employees understand that the company’s policies and procedures, especially those related to conduct, are still in effect at the party. Most parties are benign and conclude with no real issues to speak of, but you don’t want to be the exception to the rule.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558

Should I Pay Exempt Employees Who Miss Work Due to Bad Weather Conditions?

When it comes to deductions from exempt employees’ salaries it is easy to get into trouble.  The general rule is that an exempt employee is entitled to receive his or her entire salary for any workweek he or she performed work. This means, if the worksite closes for a partial week due to bad weather conditions (such as a hurricane), and the exempt employee has worked during that workweek, the employee is entitled to his or her full salary. However, if the employer has a leave benefit, such as PTO, and the employee has leave remaining, the employer can require the employee to use paid time off for this time away from work. If the employee does not have any remaining leave benefit, he or she must be paid.

If the worksite remains open during inclement weather and an employee is absent, the employee can be required to use paid time off.  If the employee does not have any paid time off remaining, the employer may deduct a full-day’s absence from the employee’s salary. For a more detailed explanation see https://www.dol.gov/whd/opinion/FLSA/2005/2005_10_24_41_FLSA.pdf.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558

 

Employers are Required to Post New Federal Posters This Month

All employers who are subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act’s (“FLSA”) minimum wage provisions and the Employee Polygraph Protection Act (“EPPA”) must post, and keep posted, notices explaining these laws. The notices must be posted in a prominent and conspicuous place in every establishment where they can readily be observed by employees and applicants for employment. These posters have been revised, and as of August 1, 2016, employers must post the revised versions.

You may download the revised posters from the United States Department of Labor (“DOL”) website at:

FLSA:  https://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/posters/flsa.htm

EPPA:  https://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/posters/eppa.htm

If you are unsure about whether you are required to post these new federally mandated posters, or would like more information about which federal posters you are required to post, you may access the DOL’s FirstStep Poster Advisor for guidance at: http://webapps.dol.gov/elaws/posters.htm.

Gail E. Farb
gfarb@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2557

U.S. Department of Labor Boosts Penalties for Violating Labor and Employment Laws

On August 1, 2016, the Department of Labor increased civil money penalties for more than 60 kinds of violations of labor and employment laws, ranging across the board from wage-and-hour rules and occupational health standards to benefits requirements and immigration regulations. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has seen the first increase to its civil penalties in 25 years, with maximum fines rising by nearly 80% to $12,471 for serious violations and $124,709 for willful or repeated violations. Other significant increases involve penalties for violations of the Immigration and Nationality Act’s prohibitions on displacing a U.S. worker with an H1B visa holder (rising from $35,000 to $50,758), as well as for violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act’s prohibitions on child labor (rising to $12,080 per violation, $54,910 if serious injury or death occurs, and $109,820 if child labor violations are willful or repeated resulting in serious injury of death). Penalties for willful violations of the FLSA’s wage and overtime provisions have also increased from $1,100 to $1,894. The increase in fines for willful FLSA violations comes on the heels of the new DOL rule extending overtime protections to nearly 4 million more workers, which could drive more wage-and-hour litigation. The DOL began applying these new, increased rates to penalties assessed after August 1, 2016.

The DOL’s announcement of its new rules to adjust civil penalties may be found here: https://www.dol.gov/newsroom/releases/opa/opa20160630.

Lindsey L. Dunn
ldunn@williamsparker.com
941-552-2556