Monthly Archives: April 2017

Beyond the Hemline: Using Fashion to Recognize Employment Law Issues in the Workplace

There is a well-known saying that a person’s eyes are the keys to the soul. In the employment context, fashion choices are often keys to employee issues that not only impact employee performance and productivity, but also (should) alert employers to issues that, if not properly handled, will lead to legal liability. It may sound odd, but fashion in the workplace often provides insight into issues that implicate important employment laws, and employers should know what to look for.

When I say fashion in the workplace, I am not talking about the fashionista boss with unreasonable expectations from the 2006 movie The Devil Wears Prada (although that character has some amazing clothes), I am talking more along the line of Peter Gibbons from Office Space (1999). Peter stops coming into work on time, and when he does come in, he is dressed in casual clothing and even wears flip flops. Seriously folks, no one at Initech wondered what was up with Peter? No one investigated? I love the film, but in my Board Certified Labor and Employment attorney opinion, that is really a major plot flaw.

Consider how fashion and employment law are tied in the following scenarios:

  1. On his fifth anniversary with the company, Bob comes to work in a dress and asks to be called Barbara.
  2. Sue shows up to your conservative workplace on a Monday covered in tattoos.
  3.  Joe shows up to work wearing clothing with politically charged statements.
  4. You have an employee whose religious garb violates your company’s dress code policy.
  5. A pregnant employee comes to work with a photo of a pot plant on her shirt.
  6. Jane, who usually comes to work really put together, comes into work several days in a row wearing over-sized clothing and heavy makeup.
  7. You have an employee that appears to be wearing the same three outfits over and over.

Do you know how to properly handle these situations? Are you aware of what laws may be implicated by each? If you are interested in learning more, on Saturday, May 6, 2017, join me and another Sarasota-area employment lawyer at the Holiday Inn Lido Beach from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., where participants will be part of an interactive presentation, including a fashion show presented contemporaneously with each scenario, that addresses the above situations (and others) and, in doing so, will review the basics of several labor and employment law issues, including but not limited to:

  • Religious Accommodation
  • Florida Domestic Violence Leave
  • Family Medical Leave Act
  • Americans with Disabilities Act
  • The Transgender Workforce
  • Gender Bias
  • Medical Marijuana
  • Employment Policies
  • Political Discourse in the Workplace

Although this presentation has been arranged by the Florida Association of Legal Support Specialists, it is open to anyone interested in attending. It has been approved for three General CLER credits. In addition, both HRCI and SHRM have confirmed with the Association that non-pre-approved attendees can obtain certification credits by directly requesting credits from the organizations using the information provided on the Attendance/CLE Certificate provided the day of the event.

Please visit falss.org for more information and to register.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Guidance for Employers from the Dark Side?

A long time ago in what seems like a galaxy far away, Congress passed the National Labor Relations Act. Since then, Congress has continued to pass laws governing the employee/employer relationship. In 1938, it passed the Fair Labor Standards Act; in 1964, it passed the Civil Rights Act; and in 1993, it passed the Family and Medical Leave Act. These acts and many others can make businesses feel like they have been thrown into a trash compacter or frozen in carbonate. Management attorneys, a.k.a the light side of the force, provide guidance and counsel to businesses and assist in navigating these laws which seem to appear and/or change as if powered by a hyper drive. On Thursday, April 27, from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at Michael’s on East in Sarasota, businesses will have an opportunity to learn about recent developments and current trends related to wage and hour compliance, employee criminal conduct, and sexual orientation and gender identity not only from their Jedi, but also from a Sith, a.k.a. a plaintiff’s employment attorney. It is not often that businesses have an opportunity to learn from both sides of the Force.

This seminar will provide guidance in important areas of employment law to assist professional service providers in their role as employers. The workshop will include best practices from legal compliance and human resources perspectives, and will conclude with a Sith providing insight into employers’ mistakes that strengthen the dark side. This seminar is intended to be an interactive presentation with the aim of providing solutions to troublesome employment issues confronting law firms and other professional service providers. To learn more about this event and to register, visit the Sarasota County Bar Association website.

Disclaimer: This seminar does not have a Star Wars theme; I just watched The Force Awakens on HBO this weekend.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

Setting the Stage for Supreme Court Review of Whether Title VII Prohibits Sexual Orientation Discrimination

Three circuit courts of appeal have issued opinions on whether Title VII prohibits sexual orientation discrimination. The Second Circuit (New York, Connecticut, and Vermont) and Eleventh Circuit (Alabama, Georgia, and Florida), relying on past precedent, have held that Title VII does not prevent discrimination based on sexual orientation. However, on April 4, 2017, the Seventh Circuit (Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin) issued a conflicting opinion, becoming the first circuit to hold that sexual orientation discrimination is indeed prohibited. Now, with the circuits split on this issue, the stage is set for the U.S. Supreme Court to be asked to resolve this conflict. However, recent reports opine that the employer in the Seventh Circuit case will not appeal the decision to the Supreme Court. If the employer does not appeal, another case will have to make its way through the lower courts before the divergence of opinion can take center stage at the Supreme Court.

Until the battle is fought before the Supreme Court, Florida employers should keep in mind that while Florida falls under the jurisdiction of the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals, and thus, arguably sexual orientation discrimination is not currently prohibited by Title VII, many municipalities, including the City of Sarasota and City of Miami, have local ordinances that prohibit such discrimination. Further, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the agency charged with enforcing Title VII, takes the position that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation constitutes sex discrimination and is therefore prohibited.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

A Successful Challenge to Local Minimum Wage Ordinances in Florida

With efforts to raise both the federal and state minimum wage meeting lackluster success, advocates of raising the minimum wage have been focusing on effecting change at the local level. In Florida, such efforts have led to ordinances raising the minimum wage in municipalities such as the City of Miami and the City of West Palm Beach. However, on March 27, 2017, a court struck down the City of Miami’s Living Wage Ordinance, finding that it is prohibited by Florida Statute § 218.077, which proscribes a municipality from establishing a minimum wage separate from the state or federal minimum wage. In reaching its decision, the court rejected the City of Miami’s argument that Article X, § 24(f), of the Florida Constitution provides explicit authority for municipalities to enact their own wage ordinances. The City still has time to appeal the decision to Florida’s Fourth District Court of Appeal.

The decision will lend support to challenges to other wage ordinances in the state. In addition, this decision may cull current efforts in other municipalities to increase minimum wages.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558