Monthly Archives: September 2016

Deadline for Filing the 2016 EEO-1 Survey is September 30

The submission deadline for private employers that are required to complete the EEO-1 Survey is September 30, 2016. The EEO-1 Report, Standard Form 100, is a compliance survey that requires company employment data to be categorized by race/ethnicity. As set forth on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s website, all companies that meet any of the following criteria are required to file the EEO-1 report annually:

    1. The company is subject to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, with 100 or more employees; or
    2. The company is subject to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, with fewer than 100 employees, if the company is owned by or corporately affiliated with another company and the entire enterprise employs a total of 100 or more employees; or
    3. The company is a Federal government prime contractor or first-tier subcontractor subject to Executive Order 11246, as amended, with 50 or more employees and a prime contract or first-tier subcontract amounting to $50,000 or more
    4. https://www.eeoc.gov/employers/eeo1survey/fact_sheet_filers.cfm
    5. https://www.eeoc.gov/employers/eeo1survey/faq.cfm
    6. If your business meets one of the three criteria set forth above and you are not familiar with the EEO-1, the following links will provide essential information:

https://www.eeoc.gov/employers/eeo1survey/faq.cfm

https://www.eeoc.gov/employers/eeo1survey/fact_sheet_filers.cfm.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558

Should I Pay Exempt Employees Who Miss Work Due to Bad Weather Conditions?

When it comes to deductions from exempt employees’ salaries it is easy to get into trouble.  The general rule is that an exempt employee is entitled to receive his or her entire salary for any workweek he or she performed work. This means, if the worksite closes for a partial week due to bad weather conditions (such as a hurricane), and the exempt employee has worked during that workweek, the employee is entitled to his or her full salary. However, if the employer has a leave benefit, such as PTO, and the employee has leave remaining, the employer can require the employee to use paid time off for this time away from work. If the employee does not have any remaining leave benefit, he or she must be paid.

If the worksite remains open during inclement weather and an employee is absent, the employee can be required to use paid time off.  If the employee does not have any paid time off remaining, the employer may deduct a full-day’s absence from the employee’s salary. For a more detailed explanation see https://www.dol.gov/whd/opinion/FLSA/2005/2005_10_24_41_FLSA.pdf.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558

 

Join Us: Doing Business in China Executive Briefing

rp-china-bannerWe invite you to join us for an engaging, informative presentation on doing business in China. Williams Parker is pleased to host Maarten Roos and Robin Tabbers, lead partners of R&P China Lawyers (Shanghai) and authors of articles recently published in Requisite V – The International Edition. Our guests will provide practical guidance on manufacturing and sourcing in China, strategies for managing a Chinese subsidiary, and best practices for selling to the Chinese market. The presentation will take place Monday, September 19, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the firm’s office, located at 200 S. Orange Ave. in downtown Sarasota.

Williams Parker and R&P China Lawyers work together as part of the Ally Law network (formerly the International Alliance of Law Firms) to provide solutions to companies doing business internationally. R&P China Lawyers is a boutique PRC law firm that supports international business in China. Its attorneys combine in-depth legal expertise and broad experience of the Chinese business environment with a keen understanding of client needs.

Space is limited. If interested in attending, please email MarketingDesk@williamsparker.com.

Conducting Appropriate Training for Employees Helps Deter Workplace Harassment

In June 2016, the EEOC issued a report by its Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace. The report details how one third of the 90,000 charges filed with the EEOC in fiscal year 2015 included an allegation of harassment. However, as set forth in the report, this number does not accurately reflect of the number of persons that experience harassment at work. One of the most surprising aspects of the report is that it concludes that “approximately 90 percent of individuals who say they have experienced harassment never [took] formal action against the harassment.” EEOC Commissioner, and report co-author, Victoria Lipnic states that the reason for this failure to take action is fear: “There have been a lot of resources devoted to this in the workplace for many years, but there is a very high percentage of people who still do not report harassment. Part of that is out of fear — fear they might be retaliated against, that they might lose their job, that no one is going to believe them.”

The report also reaches the conclusion that despite efforts of employers to educate workers regarding harassment through workplace training, that most of this training is too focused on avoiding legal liability. The report suggests that different approaches to training should be explored such as bystander intervention training, as well as civility training that focuses less on harassment but instead on promoting respect and civility in the workplace.

This study and the resulting report reinforce the need to provide employees not only with training, but training designed for the specific workforce and presented by a professional. As stated in the report summary, “[in]effective training can be unhelpful or even counterproductive….one size does not fit all: Training is most effective when tailored to the specific workforce and workplace.” Employers should look closely at the training they provide to employees, ensure that it is effective and beneficial for their workplace, and consult with counsel as needed.

A summary of the EEOC’s recommendations can be found at https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/task_force/harassment/report_summary.cfm

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558