Tag Archives: international tax

Tax Residency and the 2017 World Rowing Championships

The Sarasota-Manatee area recently hosted the 2017 World Rowing Championships, bringing nearly a thousand athletes from seventy countries to the world class rowing facilities at Nathan Benderson Park. The tax consequences of such a visit were probably far from the thoughts of the rowers, coaches, support teams, and fans arriving from all over the world. At what point should someone consider how their visits to the United States could create tax problems? Could you owe tax to the United States just by visiting the country for a rowing competition?

The United States taxes the worldwide income of those who are United States citizens and residents. Generally, any person born or naturalized in the United States will be considered a United States citizen. A person will be considered a resident of the United States by receiving U.S. permanent resident status in the way of a green card or by meeting the substantial presence test. Frequent visitors to this country or those who stay in the country for extended periods must be aware of how the substantial presence test could affect their residency status.

The substantial presence test looks at the number of days a person has spent in the United States over the past three years. Seasonal visitors to the United States, those who make frequent trips to the country for business purposes, or those who vacation in the United States may all establish residency by spending too many days on U.S. soil.

Those in the United States competing in sports may have a slight glimmer of good news. Professional athletes receive a partial exception from counting days for the substantial presence test, but only for days where a professional athlete is temporarily in the United States to compete in a charitable sporting event that is organized to benefit a tax-exempt charity, contributes 100 percent of the proceeds to charity, and uses volunteers for substantially all the work needed to run the event.

If the 2017 World Rowing Championships was your first and only trip to the United States then you likely won’t run into residency problems. But those that have fallen in love with the Sarasota-Bradenton area and plan to return for more visits need to be aware of how your stay in the United States could create tax consequences.

Jamie E. Koepsel
(941) 552-2562
jkoepsel@williamsparker.com

Going Global: What Are the International Tax Issues for a Small or Mid-Size Company

From a legal perspective, global expansion can have many forms, structures, and functions, including creating contractual relationships with distributors or licensees; establishing international legal entities for sales, manufacturing, or other business functions; or entering into an international joint venture. Regardless of the form or size of the contemplated global business expansion, there are a host of complex tax issues that have to be wrestled with in addition to the plethora of business and regulatory issues. Mike Wilson recently authored an article on this topic, which can be found here: http://www.williamsparker.com/docs/default-source/PDFs/international-tax-small-business_mjw

Michael J. Wilson
mwilson@williamsparker.com
941-536-2043

Tax Planning for Foreign Investors Purchasing Real Estate

Foreigners, especially Canadians, continue to comprise a significant percentage of Florida real estate purchases. The National Association of Realtors reported that during the recent 12-month period ending July 2013 the total sales volume of Florida residential real estate purchases by foreigners was $6.4 billion (9% of total Florida residential sales volume). 30% of these foreign purchasers were Canadian. These figures do not included foreign purchases of commercial real estate. Unfortunately, many Canadians and other foreign real estate purchasers do not sufficiently consider the U.S. tax ramifications of their purchase. There are many alternatives for structuring a foreigner’s purchase of U.S. real estate, and each alternative has tax advantages and disadvantages.

Below is a link to an article that discusses the U.S. tax issues and planning techniques that can help minimize tax headaches for Canadian (and other foreign) owners of Florida real property.

Tax Planning For Canadians Purchasing Property In Florida

If you need assistance with a foreign purchaser of U.S. real estate, please contact us.

Michael J. Wilson
mwilson@williamsparker.com
941-536-2043