Tag Archives: employees

Should I Pay Exempt Employees Who Miss Work Due to Bad Weather Conditions?

As Florida prepares for a potential direct hit by Hurricane Irma, employers have many concerns. At some point, when decisions have been made about if a business will stay open and if goods or people need to be moved out of harm’s way, the following question will most likely be asked: “Should I pay exempt employees who miss work due to bad weather conditions?”

When it comes to deductions from exempt employees’ salaries it is easy to get into trouble.  The general rule is that an exempt employee is entitled to receive his or her entire salary for any workweek he or she performed work. This means, if the worksite closes for a partial week due to bad weather conditions (such as a hurricane), and the exempt employee has worked during that workweek, the employee is entitled to his or her full salary. However, if the employer has a leave benefit, such as PTO, and the employee has leave remaining, the employer can require the employee to use paid time off for this time away from work. If the employee does not have any remaining leave benefit, he or she must be paid.

If the work site remains open during inclement weather and an employee is absent (even if due to transportation issues), the employee can be required to use paid time off.  If the employee does not have any paid time off remaining, the employer may deduct a full-day’s absence from the employee’s salary. For a more detailed explanation see this opinion letter from the U.S. Department of Labor.

As for non-exempt employees, the FLSA only requires that employees be paid for the hours they actually work. However, those non-exempt employees on fixed salaries for fluctuating workweeks, must be paid their full weekly salary in any week for which work was performed.

 

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
941-552-2558

This post was originally published on Williams Parker’s Labor & Employment Blog. To receive updates regarding labor and employment news and insight, subscribe here

Williams Parker Represents Taxpayers in Settling $16,000,000 Payroll Tax Audit

Williams Parker shareholder Mike Wilson recently led a Williams Parker team in the representation of several affiliated taxpayers that were under a combined audit by the Internal Revenue Service (the “Service”) in connection with the taxpayers’ treatment of several thousand workers as partners, instead of as employees or independent contractors, for payroll tax purposes over multiple years. By characterizing their workers as partners, the taxpayers’ took the position that the workers’ compensation was not reportable on Form W-2 or subject to withholding or payroll tax obligations. Instead, the compensation was a guaranteed payment, reportable on the workers’ Schedule K-1, and subject to self-employment tax to be paid by the workers. Not surprisingly, the Service took a very aggressive position regarding the classification of the workers as partners, arguing they were properly characterized as employees. With an exposure for the taxpayers of approximately $16,000,000 of tax, interest, and penalties, Williams Parker was able to settle the four-year dispute with the Service for approximately 12 percent of such amount.

What is the Best Way to Structure Your Purchase or Sale of a Closely-Held Business?

There are many different options for structuring the sale or purchase of a closely-held business, and determining the best option depends on several factors.  The presentation linked below discusses some of the key points to consider when selling or acquiring a business.  It also describes some of the most common types of transactions and their respective advantages and disadvantages.  Lastly, the presentation looks at certain financing arrangements used in connection with a sale or purchase as well as methods to protect the interests of the parties following the closing of the transaction.

Here is a link to the presentation:  http://williamsparker.com/docs/default-source/presentations/legal-considerations-for-structuring-business-sale-or-acquisition.pdf?sfvrsn=4

Zachary B. Buffington
zbuffington@williamsparker.com
(941) 893-4000