Tag Archives: employee

IRS Issues Small Business Tax Reform Regulations, Clarifies Combinations of Business Entities

The tax reform legislation Congress passed in December left many details unanswered, especially regarding the small business tax benefit giving some businesses a twenty percent deduction against their income if the businesses satisfy certain employee payroll and property ownership thresholds. On August 8, the Internal Revenue Service issued proposed regulations attempting to address many of the open questions.

One of the biggest questions was whether taxpayers can treat employee payroll and property owned across multiple business entities (like corporation and limited liability companies) as a single combined business for the purpose of satisfying the employee payroll and property ownership tests.

For most types of businesses, the regulations generally would allow aggregation of property and payroll amongst different entities (such as partnerships and S corporations) if the same group of persons own the majority of the business for the majority of the year, the entities satisfy certain integration and interdependence tests, and the taxpayers follow specified filing procedures.

Those rules will not apply to most professional businesses, which are subject to limitations in the use of the small business deduction. These businesses are subject to rules forcing aggregation of income to prevent circumvention of the deduction limitations.

The rules are not fully binding until finalized, but IRS will apply the anti-abuse rules retroactively. Taxpayers can rely on these proposed rules until they are finalized.

We will provide more perspective on these important new rules soon. In the meantime, for more details, you can read the proposed regulations at irs.gov.

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037

Independent Contractor or Employee? That is the Question!

A person can provide services to a company as an employee or an independent contractor depending upon the nature of the relationship between the service provider and the company. Misclassification of employees as independent contractors remains a primary focus of many government agencies, including the IRS, U.S. Department of Labor, Florida Department of Economic Opportunity Reemployment Assistance Programs, and Florida’s Division of Workers’ Compensation.  Investigations by these agencies can be extremely costly, time-consuming, and even lead to personal liability and criminal penalties!

The presentation in the following link explains the detailed federal and Florida tests that are used by these four agencies to properly classify service providers.  It also provides practical examples in which the tests can be applied.  Additionally, the presentation includes guidance to help mitigate the potential for employer liability regarding other wage and hour complexities and pitfalls.

Independent Contractor or Employee? That is the Question!

Gail E. Farb
gfarb@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2557