Tag Archives: Congress

The Republican Tax Plan Is Out. What Now?

On November 2, 2017, House Republicans unveiled their widespread rewrite of the U.S. Tax Code. The tax plan, called the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, is a 429-page bill that provides changes to many aspects of tax law including the corporate tax rate, individual tax rates, the taxes levied on pass-through businesses such as partnerships, and estate taxes. While the bill is unlikely to be signed into law in its present form, certain key provisions of the proposal highlight the direction Republicans hope to take the U.S. Tax Code.

A notable provision is the slashing of the corporate tax rate from its current 35 percent rate to a new 20 percent rate. While earlier proposals considered a temporary rate reduction, the current proposal would make this tax cut permanent. Another much-discussed change is the introduction of a 25 percent tax rate for pass-through businesses such as partnerships and S-corporations. Most items of active income being passed through a business to partners or shareholders would be taxed at a maximum 25 percent rate, rather than the current 39.6 percent minimum rate.

The new tax plan also provides significant changes to how individuals are taxed. Key provisions reduce the seven individual tax brackets to four brackets of 12 percent, 25 percent, 35 percent, and 39.6 percent. The 39.6 percent top bracket will only apply for married couples earning at least $1 million a year or individuals earning at least $500,000 a year. The estate tax exemption would be raised to $11.2 million from its current $5.6 million amount, with the estate tax repealed entirely by 2024.

This is only the beginning of tax reform. The bill must still pass the Senate and be approved by the President, a tall task even if Republicans control each aspect of the legislative process. The reaction of Senators, and more importantly the reaction of voters, will determine whether the tax plan is passed, amended, or rejected entirely.

Jamie E. Koepsel
jkoepsel@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2562

Why the President’s Latest Tax Reform Proposal Isn’t Even Nine Times Very Little

In April, the last time tax reform bubbled into the news cycle, we discouraged readers from paying much attention. President Trump’s “proposal” was this single page of bullet points that told us too little to evaluate its merit.

Tax reform returned to headlines this week, with the President offering this nine-page proposal.

If we use the “number-of-pages” method to evaluate work product, we might expect the new plan to include nine times as much meaningful information. Even if we discount the new document three and one-half pages for including a cover page and five pages only half-full of text, we might hope the new plan offers five and one-half times the information we gathered from April’s one-page plan.

It doesn’t. The new plan largely replicates the prior plan’s bullet points, adding some additional nontechnical explanation and a more impressive presentation format. It adds little, if anything.

Our advice hasn’t changed.  Don’t get excited.  Don’t exert energy seeking substance about tax reform just yet.

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037

Why You Probably Can Ignore President Trump’s Tax Proposal for Now

On Wednesday, President Trump released his tax proposal.

Take a look. It won’t take long. That’s it. One page of bullet points.

For comparison, now look at this discussion of then-candidate Trump’s tax proposals during the presidential election campaign last fall.

Anything new? Not really.

While restating campaign promises may initiate the legislative discussion, doing so tells us little about what might actually appear in legislation hammered out by competing factions in Congress.

So whether you are excited or disappointed about lower corporate tax rates or estate tax repeal, we suggest re-averting your attention to other matters for the time being.

To that end, this missive also ends without further elaboration.

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037

Guidance for Employers from the Dark Side

A long time ago in what seems like a galaxy far away, Congress passed the National Labor Relations Act. Since then, Congress has continued to pass laws governing the employee/employer relationship. In 1938, it passed the Fair Labor Standards Act; in 1964, it passed the Civil Rights Act; and in 1993, it passed the Family and Medical Leave Act. These acts and many others can make businesses feel like they have been thrown into a trash compacter or frozen in carbonate. Management attorneys, a.k.a the light side of the force, provide guidance and counsel to businesses and assist in navigating these laws which seem to appear and/or change as if powered by a hyper drive.

On Thursday, April 27, from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at Michael’s on East in Sarasota, businesses will have an opportunity to learn about recent developments and current trends related to wage and hour compliance, employee criminal conduct, and sexual orientation and gender identity not only from their Jedi, but also from a Sith, a.k.a. a plaintiff’s employment attorney. It is not often that businesses have an opportunity to learn from both sides of the Force.

This seminar will provide guidance in important areas of employment law to assist professional service providers in their role as employers. The workshop will include best practices from legal compliance and human resources perspectives, and will conclude with a Sith providing insight into employers’ mistakes that strengthen the dark side. This seminar is intended to be an interactive presentation with the aim of providing solutions to troublesome employment issues confronting law firms and other professional service providers. To learn more about this event and to register, visit the Sarasota County Bar Association website.

Disclaimer: This seminar does not have a Star Wars theme; I just watched The Force Awakens on HBO this weekend.

Jennifer Fowler-Hermes
jfowler-hermes@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2558

The above post was originally published on The Williams Parker Labor & Employment blog

Does a Republican Sweep Augur Federal Tax Reform?

Amongst many things, the Republican sweep in yesterday’s election improves prospects for the most significant tax reforms since 1986.

While we instinctually focus on possible changes to our personal tax burdens, business income taxation may offer the most opportunities for structural reforms. Structural changes may or may not reduce the amount of tax revenue. They are, at least in theory, policy driven to encourage business behavior consistent with greater economic growth.

Changes on the table include taxing business income that is reinvested (rather than distributed to owners for their personal uses) at a lower rate, and changing the international tax regime to a territorial system that does not tax income earned in other countries when repatriated to the United States. The former may encourage business investment spending. The latter may reduce distortions in capital flows into the United States caused by the current tax regime. Both changes would bring the United States closer in line with the tax systems in other developed countries.

And, of course, our leaders will revisit Obamacare, including the new taxes it created.

President-Elect Donald Trump’s proposals do not exactly match those in Congress. Disagreement could impede reform. But with House Speaker Paul Ryan and President-Elect Trump both focusing on tax reform, we will see the most serious tax reform debate in many years.

Here are links to recent media discussion of possible tax reforms:

http://www.wsj.com/articles/donald-trump-win-gives-gop-fuel-to-slash-taxes-1478687402

http://www.forbes.com/sites/anthonynitti/2016/11/09/president-trump-what-does-it-mean-for-your-tax-bill/#53ec8be84b8b

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037