Williams Parker to Participate in International Trade Symposium at Port Manatee

On Thursday, February 22, 2018, Williams Parker will be participating in an International Trade Symposium organized by the International Trade Hub at Port Manatee hosting an association of trade commissioners from Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Spain, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay, Dominican Republic, Brazil, Argentina, and Canada. These trade commissioners cooperate to expand and facilitate the international commercial relations with Florida and are mainly based in Miami. Following the symposium at Port Manatee, a luncheon will take place at the Manatee Chamber of Commerce featuring a brief presentation by Williams Parker attorney Jamie Koepsel regarding the international aspects of the recent tax legislation.

If you are in the retail industry or simply interested in international trade and want to learn more about how you can expand your business to international markets, you may want to consider participating in the event. A great number of the trade commissioners have already confirmed their participation in the event. Establishing relationships with the trade commissioners will be valuable to your business growth plans. The trade commissioners will help you navigate the markets and cultures of the countries where you want to do business.

Please contact Williams Parker attorney Juliana Ferro for more information.

A Little Clarity for Non-U.S. Persons Selling Partnership Interests

A Spanish translation of this post appears below. La traducción al español de este artículo aparece a continuación.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act provided clarity to a question of how to treat gain or loss from the sale or exchange of a partnership interest held by a foreign person. The IRS, through Revenue Ruling 91-32, previously provided that “the gain realized by a foreign partner upon disposing of its interest in a U.S. partnership should be analyzed asset by asset and, to the extent any such asset would give rise to effectively connected income, the departing partner’s pro rata share of such gain should be treated as effectively connected income.” The Tax Court disagreed with the findings of Revenue Ruling 91-32 in Grecian Magnesite Mining, Industrial & Shipping Co., SA v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue and instead held that income, gain, or loss from the sale or exchange of a U.S. partnership interest by a foreign person will only be attributable to a U.S. office, and thus taxed as effectively connected income, if the U.S. office is a material factor in the production of such income, gain, or loss in the ordinary course of business of that U.S. office.

Rather than waiting for courts to come to a consensus as to how to treat gain or loss from a foreign person’s sale of a partnership interest, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act amended the previous tax law and took the position of Revenue Ruling 91-32. Now if a partnership has a U.S. office and a foreign person sells an interest in such a partnership, then an asset-by-asset analysis will need to be conducted to determine how much of the gain or loss from such a sale will be subject to U.S. taxes.

For more information regarding the Tax Act, please see our recent related blog posts linked below:

Jamie E. Koepsel
jkoepsel@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2562

Un poco de claridad para personas no estadounidenses que ofrecen a la venta su participación en una sociedad americana (también conocida como “U.S. Partnership”)

La ley de recortes fiscales y empleos de 2017, conocida como el “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,” dió claridad a la cuestión de cómo tratar las ganancias o pérdidas de capital generadas después de la venta o intercambio de capital de una sociedad americana (“U.S. partnership”) en poder de una persona no estadounidense.

El IRS (Servicio de Impuestos Internos), a través de la Resolución de Impuestos 91-32, sostenía que las ganancias generadas por un socio extranjero al vender o transferir su parte en una sociedad americana debían ser analizadas activo por activo y, en la medida en que las ganancias de cualquier activo estuviesen vinculadas a una actividad realizada en los Estados Unidos, las ganancias de dicho socio (medidas en proporción a su participación en la sociedad) debían ser tratadas como ingresos efectivamente vinculados a una actividad realizada en los Estados Unidos.

El tribunal de impuestos no estuvo de acuerdo con la forma en que la Resolución de Impuestos 91-32 fue interpretada en el caso de Grecian Magnesite Mining, Industrial & Shipping Co., SA v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue. El tribunal sostuvo que los ingresos, ganancias, o pérdidas generadas en la venta o intercambio de la participación de una sociedad americana por una persona extranjera debían ser atribuibles solamente a una oficina ubicada en los Estados Unidos y ser tratadas como ingresos efectivamente vinculados, solamente si la oficina ubicada en los Estados Unidos era indispensable para la producción de dichos ingresos, ganancias, o pérdidas en el curso ordinario de los negocios de la oficina ubicada en los Estados Unidos.

En lugar de esperar a que los tribunales llegaran a un consenso en cuanto a cómo tratar las ganancias o pérdidas generadas en la venta de capital de una sociedad en propiedad de una persona extranjera, la reforma fiscal de 2017 modificó la ley tributaria anterior y asumió la regla establecida por la Resolución de Impuestos 91-32. Ahora, si una sociedad tiene una oficina ubicada en los Estados Unidos y una persona extranjera vende su participación en tal sociedad, un análisis de cada activo debe ser conducido para determinar el monto de las ganancias o pérdidas sujetas a impuestos en los Estados Unidos.

Traducción por Juliana Ferro, Abogada

Tax Savings Estimator: Qualified Business Income Deduction

If you own a business taxed as a sole proprietorship, partnership, or S corporation, the new Section 199A Qualified Business Income Deduction offers one of the biggest potential tax benefits under the recently-enacted Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. It allows you to deduct up to twenty percent of your business income. If your income exceeds $157,500 ($315,000 for a married joint filer), the deduction is limited by filters tied to your company’s employee payroll and depreciable property ownership. There are other restrictions, but for most business owners our calculator offers a useful, simplified estimate of tax savings from the new deduction.

Curious whether you should change the tax status of your company? Read our analysis here: Should You Reform Your Business for Tax Reform?

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037

A Guide to the Toll Charge of the Tax Act

Shareholders in foreign businesses could find themselves hit with an immediate tax on offshore earnings under the recently passed “Tax Act,” officially known as “An Act to provide for reconciliation pursuant to titles II and V of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018.”  Before the Tax Act, most foreign income earned by US shareholders through foreign corporations would only be subject to US taxes when the foreign income was paid to those US shareholders as dividends. The Subpart F rules were a way for the United States to capture some of this offshore income in the US tax base, but careful planning meant many US shareholders with foreign companies could keep money offshore and out of the US tax system for years. Some estimates put the amount of this offshore money at nearly $3 trillion, so any change to how the United States treats foreign taxes would look into how best to address these offshore earnings.

The Tax Act will look to capture some of this offshore income through a one-time immediate increase in the Subpart F income of certain US persons investing in foreign corporations.  The amount of income immediately taxed by the United States will increase by the greater of (i) accumulated post-1986 deferred foreign income determined as of November 2, 2017, or (ii) the accumulated post-1986 deferred foreign income determined as of December 31, 2017.  The tax rate on this deferred foreign income will be 8 percent for non-cash E&P and 15.5 percent for cash E&P.  This one-time tax has been referred to as a “Toll Charge” for how it may allow offshore income to flow back into the United States.

The Toll Charge is not a routine E&P calculation for US shareholders of foreign corporations.  Year-by-year ownership percentages, whether E&P is cash or non-cash, and the availability of certain foreign tax credits will all affect the final tax due.  The Tax Act has allowed for the payment of the Toll Charge in installments if sufficient cash to make payments is unavailable.

For more information regarding the Tax Act, please see our recent related blog posts linked below:

Jamie E. Koepsel
jkoepsel@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2562

Welcome the New Year With Our Updated Tax Reform Review

On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law the most important rewrite of the US tax code in decades. The federal law, which is entitled “An Act to provide for reconciliation pursuant to titles II and V of the concurrent resolution of the budget for the fiscal year 2018” (the Act), has no other name, as its short title, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, was stricken from the bill shortly before being signed.

We have prepared a summary of the Act as a non-exhaustive discussion of key changes to the tax code. We will continue to analyze the Act and will post updates and recommend planning strategies on this blog.

For more information regarding the Act, please see our previous related blog posts linked below:

On behalf of everyone at Williams Parker, we hope you and your family have a healthy and happy 2018.

Please note this post was co-authored by Elizabeth Diaz, Colton Castro, and Nicholas Gard. 

Elizabeth P. Diaz
ediaz@williamsparker.com
941-329-6631

Colton F. Castro
ccastro@williamsparker.com
(941) 329-6608

Nicholas A. Gard
ngard@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2563

Planning to Live Beyond 2025? How You Can Still Enjoy Estate Tax Reform’s Sunset Special

The just-enacted Tax Cuts and Jobs Act doubles the federal estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer lifetime tax exemptions through 2025. The exemptions revert to their pre-Act levels on January 1, 2026. Ignoring inflation adjustments, the combined exemptions for a married couple will then fall from over $22 million to $11 million. At the 40% Federal transfer tax rate, a 2026 sunset will increase a married couple’s estate tax by $4.4 million.

Do you want to avoid $4.4 million of estate tax, even if you plan to celebrate the 2026 New Year amongst the living?

A married couple can permanently harvest the increased exemptions by gifting assets with value up to the full $22 million exemption amount before 2026. If you gift into a generation-skipping trust, the exempted assets can pass through many generations free of transfer tax. With valuation discounts for lack of control and lack of marketability still fully available, family business assets are particularly attractive for gifting.

A taxpayer can not use the increased exemption until he or she first make gifts exhausting his or her pre-Act exemption. An individual does not create an additional tax benefit until he or she first gifts about $5.5 million worth of property. A couple does not capture the full additional benefit until they give away property worth over $22 million.

These ordering rules create an obstacle for many, who can not afford to give away that much property. Married taxpayers in that situation may consider funding “Spousal Lifetime Access Trusts.” Each spouse gifts assets to a trust for the other spouse, leaving the gifted assets available to the beneficiary spouse for his or her lifetime. When the beneficiary spouse dies, the remaining trust assets pass to children or other beneficiaries free of estate tax. Persons who created such trusts shortly before 2013, when another legislative sunset almost reduced the lifetime exemptions, can fund their existing trusts with additional gifts.

Many families will wait until 2026 is closer before taking action. Families with sufficient wealth to afford substantial gifting, who also expect estate tax liability even with the increased exemptions, should consider gifting sooner, to remove appreciation in the gifted assets before 2026 from their future taxable estates.

For more information regarding the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, follow these links:

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037

Rethinking Large 2017 Year-End Charitable Gifts

With the standard exemption increasing and federal income tax rates generally falling in 2018, accelerating charitable gifts into 2017 may seem like a no-brainer. You might want to think twice if you plan a large charitable gift.

Under current law, the income tax charitable deduction and many other itemized deductions gradually phase out as income increases above $313,800 for married jointly filing taxpayers. The phase out continues until the deductions are reduced by 80%.

The just-enacted Tax Cuts and Jobs Act suspends this limitation, allowing charitable and other itemized deductions without the income-based phase out.  This could cause a 2018 charitable gift to produce a more valuable tax benefit than a 2017 gift, particularly for large gifts.

If you are unsure how to proceed, ask your CPA to run the numbers in both scenarios.  Better to wait a year for the deduction, than to receive a much smaller benefit than you expected.

For more information regarding the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, follow these LINKS:

http://blog.williamsparker.com/businessandtax/2017/12/18/whats-tax-reform-bill/

http://blog.williamsparker.com/businessandtax/2017/12/18/reform-business-tax-reform/

http://blog.williamsparker.com/businessandtax/2017/12/19/2017-year-end-planning-art-equipment-non-real-estate-1031-exchanges/

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037

 

2017 Year-End Planning for Art, Equipment, and Other Non-Real Estate 1031 Exchanges

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act eliminates Section 1031 Exchanges for non-real estate transactions effective January 1, 2018.  But you still have time to plan If you anticipated executing an early-2018 1031 Exchange with art, equipment, or other non-real estate investment assets.

The Act includes a transition rule that allows a taxpayer to complete a non-real estate 1031 Exchange during 2018 if the taxpayer either acquires replacement property for a “reverse” exchange or disposes of relinquished property for a “forward” exchange before January 1, 2018.

To take advantage with property you haven’t sold, consider causing a related-party taxpayer—such as a corporation you control—to purchase the property before year-end, and escrowing the proceeds with a qualified intermediary. The related party can sell the property to an unrelated party with a stepped-up tax basis a few years later.  You can complete the 1031 Exchange in 2018 using the escrowed proceeds in the usual 1031 Exchange time frames.

For a reverse exchange, you can park replacement property purchased before year end with an accommodation titleholder, and complete the exchange by selling the relinquished property in 2018 within the usual 1031 Exchange time frames, with the same result.

These strategies are not risk-less.  For example, in the forward exchange scenario, you will recognize gain and pay tax if you can’t complete the exchange within 180 days, even though you initially “sold” property to a related party.  But in the right situation, some taxpayers might nevertheless use the transition rules to make something out of nothing.

To read the transition rules, see page 192 of the Act.

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037

 

Should You Reform Your Business for Tax Reform?

If you own a closely-held business, it likely utilizes a “pass-through” S corporation or partnership tax classification.  The owners pay income tax individually on pass-through entity income, whether or not the business distributes the income.

C corporations are different.  C corporations pay tax on their own income.  The shareholders pay an additional dividend tax only when the C corporation distributes dividends.

Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that Congress likely will pass Tuesday, the federal tax rate on retained C corporation income will drop from 35% to 21%.  The top individual tax rate, which also applies to pass-through entities, will equal 37%.  The Act makes C corporation tax status more attractive than in the past.

Should you convert your pass-through business to a C corporation?  

Should you change the tax classification of your business?

The short-answer: Probably not, unless you plan to own the business a long time and indefinitely reinvest profits.

A longer answer:

Under the Act, converting your business into a C corporation creates a trade-off between:

  1. a lower tax rate on operating income, leaving more cash to reinvest in the business; and
  2. paying more tax (or getting a lower purchase price) when you sell the company, and having less flexibility taking profits out of the business in the meantime.

If you convert your Florida-based pass-through business to a C corporation, the business will pay state income taxes that pass-through entities avoid. The C corporation’s combined federal and state tax rate will reach just over 25% on reinvested income.

The problems? You will pay a higher or equivalent tax rate, as compared to the pass-through tax rate, if you take the profits out of the corporation.  If you sell the business as a C corporation you will (1) pay about a 43% combined corporate-level and shareholder-level tax rate on the sale gain (versus a likely 20% or 23.8% rate as a pass-through), or (2) receive a lower purchase price to compensate a buyer willing to purchase the corporation stock for forgoing a tax basis step up in the corporate assets.  And if laws or circumstances change, you cannot always readily convert back to pass-through status without negative tax consequences.

What’s in the Act for Pass-Through S Corporations and Partnerships?

The Act includes a new deduction of up-to-20% of income for pass-through businesses.  If your business earns $10 million of income, you might qualify to deduct $2 million.  The deduction would save $740,000 in federal income tax and reduce the business’ effective income tax rate from about 36% to approximately 29%.

The catch?  For taxpayers with income over about $400,000 (or a lower threshold for persons other than married, joint filers), the Act limits the deduction to (1) 50% of the wages paid to employees, or (2) the sum of 25% of wages, plus 2.5% of the value of owned depreciable property.  If the business earns a $10 million profit, but its payroll is $3 million, you may only qualify to deduct $1.5 million, not $2 million. Unless the business has a lot of payroll or owns substantial depreciable property, its tax rate may remain in the mid-to-high 30% range.

Despite the new deduction, the Act leaves most pass-through entity owners paying a higher tax rate than C corporations pay on reinvested business profits.  But most pass-through entities retain the advantages of a lower tax rate on profits distributed to owners and on the sale of the business.

What to Do?

If you can predict future payroll and equipment purchases, the price and timing of a business sale, and Congress’ whims, you can perform a present value calculation to decide whether pass-through or C corporation tax status is best for your business.  The calculation would compare the pre-business-sale tax savings from the reduced C corporation tax rate on reinvested profits, against the increased tax on distributed profits and from a future business sale.

The math is more complicated for businesses qualifying for other tax breaks, such as the Section 1202 small business stock gain exclusion.  It grows even more complicated if the model considers the tax effects of an owner’s death.

If your crystal ball isn’t clear, you are stuck making best guesses about the future of politics and your business.  But if you frequently take profits out of your business or imagine selling it in the foreseeable future, you probably will stick with the pass-through  tax status your business already uses.

For more comprehensive information regarding the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, follow this link to our previous post.

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037

What’s in the Tax Reform Bill?

Congress is set to pass the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which includes the most comprehensive changes to the federal tax law in over thirty years.

We will provide insight regarding the new law in the coming days and weeks.

In the meantime, here is a chart summarizing salient provisions in the Act.

Here is a link to the Act (including Congress’ explanation of the law beginning on page 510).

E. John Wagner, II
jwagner@williamsparker.com
941-536-2037