Category Archives: Affordable Care Act

Welcome the New Year With Our Updated Tax Reform Review

On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law the most important rewrite of the US tax code in decades. The federal law, which is entitled “An Act to provide for reconciliation pursuant to titles II and V of the concurrent resolution of the budget for the fiscal year 2018” (the Act), has no other name, as its short title, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, was stricken from the bill shortly before being signed.

We have prepared a summary of the Act as a non-exhaustive discussion of key changes to the tax code. We will continue to analyze the Act and will post updates and recommend planning strategies on this blog.

For more information regarding the Act, please see our previous related blog posts linked below:

On behalf of everyone at Williams Parker, we hope you and your family have a healthy and happy 2018.

Please note this post was co-authored by Elizabeth Diaz, Colton Castro, and Nicholas Gard. 

Elizabeth P. Diaz
ediaz@williamsparker.com
941-329-6631

Colton F. Castro
ccastro@williamsparker.com
(941) 329-6608

Nicholas A. Gard
ngard@williamsparker.com
(941) 552-2563

Supreme Court Upholds the Affordable Care Act

The Supreme Court has issued its opinion in King v. Burwell, the much anticipated case regarding whether Affordable Care Act subsidies are available to purchasers of insurance on the Federal Exchange or whether the plain language of the Act restricted such subsidies to only those purchasing insurance through an “Exchange established by the State.” The Court, over strongly worded dissent, determined that the Act permitted payment of subsidies for insurance purchased through the Federal Exchange, leaving Obamacare, as it is known, intact. Had the court ruled as the dissent held, then millions of people would have effectively been exempted from the requirement to purchase health insurance (the “individual mandate”) because their health insurance cost, when not supplemented by a subsidy, would have exceeded 8% of income. The outcome of such a decision could have led to the “death spiral” for the Act, since the underlying financial assumptions that keep insurers in business are directly related to the effectiveness of the individual mandate.

The Court’s decision will provide certainty in the healthcare marketplace. King v. Burwell was widely seen as the last, and best, chance for opponents of the Act to obtain a judicial veto of the Act. Opponents of Obamacare now realize the Court will make every effort to uphold the Act in future cases.

Read Supreme Court Opinion here:  Supreme Court Opinion

 John L. Moore
jmoore@williamsparker.com
941-329-6620