Category Archives: 2704 Regulations

2704 Regulations Explained: Proposed Rules Are Set to Further Expand Value Differences between Family-Controlled Entities and Other Companies

The IRS is focused on reducing valuation discounts associated with transfers of interests in family-controlled businesses, but this focus will result in family members being deemed to receive a different value than non-family members.  This also means that an appraiser will be required to establish two different values based on ignoring certain restrictions for family members, while taking those same restrictions into consideration for non-family members.

Consider, for example, a trust that provides that 50 percent of a decedent’s family-controlled business interest will go to charity and the remaining 50 percent will go to family members.  The IRS will be expecting that the interest being conveyed to the family members to result in a higher value when compared to the same percentage interest being conveyed to charity.  This ultimately means that the interest conveyed to family will result in higher estate taxes and the interest conveyed to charity will result in a smaller charitable deduction for estate tax purposes.  The end result is the IRS receives more estate tax from the estate even though the same restrictions apply to all members (both the family members and charity).

This post is part of a series of blog posts addressing the proposed 2704 regulations and the parties that should be reviewing their plans as a result.

View previous posts:

Thomas J. McLaughlin
tmclaughlin@williamsparker.com
941-536-2042

2704 Regulations Explained: Proposed Rules Negating Gift and Estate Tax Valuation Discounts May Ensnare Your Vacation Home Too

As mentioned in several recent posts, the proposed regulations under Code Section 2704 are aimed at reducing valuation discounts associated with transfers of interests in family-controlled businesses.  So that the proposed regulations capture certain entities that may be disregarded for federal income tax purposes, such as single-member limited liability companies, the definition of a family controlled entity under the regulations casts a wide net.  In fact, this net is so expansive that it has the ability to reach certain business arrangements that are significantly different from the typical family business.

Consider, for example, three siblings who own a vacation home as tenants-in-common.  Assume that the siblings have executed a co-tenancy agreement that restricts each tenant’s ability to partition and sell their interest (as many of these agreements do).  If this arrangement constitutes a controlled entity under the proposed regulations, then the regulations would apply to this co-tenancy arrangement in generally the same manner that they would apply to an active trade or business.  Should the proposed regulations apply, if a co-tenant transfers his or her interest in the vacation home (either during life or at death), the value of this interest for transfer tax purposes may be computed without regard to the restriction on partition in the co-tenancy agreement and, in turn, any valuation discounts that this restriction may warrant.  In this event, the application of the proposed regulations may result in a higher gift or estate tax value associated with this transfer.

This post is part of a series of blog posts addressing the proposed 2704 regulations and the parties that should be reviewing their plans as a result.

View previous posts:

Douglas J. Elmore
delmore@williamsparker.com
(941) 329-6637

2704 Regulations Explained: Winners and Losers of Proposed §2704 Regulations, Is the IRS a Loser?

The recently issued proposed regulations under Code Section 2704 are specifically targeted at substantially reducing valuation discounts associated with family-controlled businesses.  The clear losers are the families that have taxable estates. These families will likely pay additional estate and gift tax once the §2704 regulations are finalized. In order to reduce the impact that will occur when the regulations are finalized, families that have taxable estates should review their existing plans to determine whether planning now could save them substantially later.

The IRS is likely to win in the long run, but the increased estate and gift tax revenue will be offset to an extent by a reduction in income tax.  In addition, courts have been reluctant to go along with the IRS’s past attempts to substantially change the value of a family-controlled business. Accordingly, if the IRS finalizes the regulations without substantial changes, we can expect multiple challenges to be forthcoming from taxpayers, which could further reduce what the IRS likely perceives as a significant revenue booster.

The clear winners are the family business owners that do not have taxable estates ($5.45MM on an individual basis and $10.9MM for a married couple) because the proposed regulations should allow their family to receive a larger step up in the income tax basis of the business, and in some cases the business’ assets, when they pass away.

This post is part of a series of blog posts addressing the proposed 2704 regulations and the parties that should be reviewing their plans as a result.

View previous posts:

Thomas J. McLaughlin
tmclaughlin@williamsparker.com
941-536-2042

2704 Regulations Explained: Why is the IRS Targeting Valuation Discounts on Family Controlled Entities?

The simple answer is that the IRS believes that valuation discounts taken on family controlled entities are falsely high, which results in lower transfer tax revenue to the Treasury.  With the foregoing in mind, it is important to understand how the IRS, courts, and taxpayers value a business interest under current law for estate and gift tax purposes.  The general rule for a valuation is to determine the price at which property would change hands between a willing buyer and a willing seller, both of whom have reasonable knowledge of the facts and neither of whom is compelled to complete the transaction.

The courts and the IRS have recognized that discounts should be allowed where the property transferred is a minority interest in an entity that cannot force or compel the entity to act (“lack of control”) and where there is a limited market for the property (“lack of marketability”).  Taxpayers and their planners began to take advantage of this knowledge by adjusting their entity’s governing documents to increase the discounts available when transferring interests to family members.  In 1990, Congress enacted Code Sections 2701 through 2704, known as Chapter 14, to quell what was seen by some as aggressive, and in some cases abusive, uses of these discounts to reduce transfer tax values especially when many of the restrictions imposed had limited or no significant substantive effect because the family had the ability to fully control the entity and eliminate the restrictions at its will.  Since Chapter 14 became effective, the IRS has slowly seen Chapter 14’s impact dwindle due to court decisions and changes in state law.  As a result, the Treasury began seeking legislative changes to Chapter 14; however, these changes were not getting traction in Congress after several years.  The proposed regulations are Treasury’s response to the inaction of Congress and an attempt to substantially reduce discounts that the Treasury believes to be an estate and gift tax planning fiction.

Over the next several weeks we will be providing a series of blog posts addressing the proposed regulations and a synopsis of the parties that should be reviewing their plans as a result of the regulations.

Thomas J. McLaughlin
tmclaughlin@williamsparker.com
941-536-2042